Letter to James Arlington Bennet, 8 September 1842

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with him, may be assured that I will not persecute them; but I do not wish their association; and what I have said may suffice on that subject, so far as his character is concerned.
Now in relation to his book, that he may write, I will venture a prophecy, that whoever has any hand in the matter, will find themselves in a poor fix, in relation to the money matters. And as to my having any fears of the influence that he may have against me, or any other man, or set of men may have is the most foreign from my heart; for I never knew what it was, as yet, to fear the face of clay, or the influence of man. My fear, Sir, is before God. I fear to offend him, and strive to keep his commandments. I am realy glad that you did not join in relation to his book; from the assurances which I have, that it will prove a curse to all those who touch it.
In relation to the honors that you speak of, both for yourself, and for Mr of the Herald, you are <​both​> strangers to me; and as kept all his letters which he received from you, entirely to himself; and there was no corresponce between you and me that I knew of, I had no opportunity to share very largely, in the getting up of any of those matters. I could not, as I had not sufficient knowledge to enable me to do so. The whole therefore, was at the instigation of , and a quiet submission on the part of the rest, out of the best of feelings. But as for myself it was all done at a time when I was overwhelmed with a great many business cares, as well as the care of [p. 3]
with him, may be assured that I will not persecute them; but I do not wish their association; and what I have said may suffice on that subject, so far as his character is concerned.
Now in relation to his book, that he may write, I will venture a prophecy, that whoever has any hand in the matter, will find themselves in a poor fix, in relation to the money matters. And as to my having any fears of the influence that he may have against me, or any other man, or set of men may have is the most foreign from my heart; for I never knew what it was, as yet, to fear the face of clay, or the influence of man. My fear, Sir, is before God. I fear to offend him, and strive to keep his commandments. I am realy glad that you did not join in relation to his book; from the assurances which I have, that it will prove a curse to all those who touch it.
In relation to the honors that you speak of, both for yourself, and for Mr of the Herald, you are both strangers to me; and as kept all his letters which he received from you, entirely to himself; and there was no corresponce between you and me that I knew of, I had no opportunity to share very largely, in the getting up of any of those matters. I could not, as I had not sufficient knowledge to enable me to do so. The whole therefore, was at the instigation of , and a quiet submission on the part of the rest, out of the best of feelings. But as for myself it was all done at a time when I was overwhelmed with a great many business cares, as well as the care of [p. 3]
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