Sidney Rigdon, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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was made for Joseph Smith Sen , , and myself, to go into their camp with this request <​demand​> we instantly complied and accordingly started to their camp when we came in sight of their camp the whole army was on parade marching toward the . we approached and met them, and was <​were​> informed by that we were prisoners of war, a scene then followed that would defy any mortal to discribe. a howling was set up, that would put any thing I ever heard before or since at defiance. I thought at the time It had no parallel except it might be in the perdition of ungodly men. They had a cannon. I could distinctly hear the snaping guns as the locks were sprung which appeared from the sound to be in every part of the army came riding up where we were, and swore by his maker that he would hew the first man down that cocked a gun. one or two other officers on horse back also rode up ordering those who had cocked their guns to uncock them or they would be hewed down with their swords, we were conducted into their camp and made to lay on the ground through the night This was late in October. We were kept here for two days and two nights It commenced raining and snowing untill we were completely drenched and being compeld to lay on the ground which had become very wet and the water was runing round us and under us. What consultation the officers and others had in relation to the disposition which was to be made of us. I am intirely indebted to the report made to me by as none of us were ever called put on any trial. gave an account of which the <​foll[owin]g ​> is the substance as far as my memory serves me, “That they held a court martial and sentenced us to be shot at eight o Clock the next morning after the court martial was holden in the publick square, in the presence of our familis, that this court martial was composed [p. [15]]
was made for Joseph Smith Sen , , and myself, to go into their camp with this demand we instantly complied and accordingly started to their camp when we came in sight of their camp the whole army was on parade marching toward the . we approached and met them, and were informed by that we were prisoners of war, a scene then followed that would defy any mortal to discribe. a howling was set up, that would put any thing I ever heard before or since at defiance. I thought at the time It had no parallel except it might be in the perdition of ungodly men. They had a cannon. I could distinctly hear the guns as the locks were sprung which appeared from the sound to be in every part of the army came riding up where we were, and swore by his maker that he would hew the first man down that cocked a gun. one or two other officers on horse back also rode up ordering those who had cocked their guns to uncock them or they would be hewed down with their swords, we were conducted into their camp and made to lay on the ground through the night This was late in October. We were kept here for two days and two nights It commenced raining and snowing untill we were completely drenched and being compeld to lay on the ground which had become very wet and the water was runing round us and under us. What consultation the officers and others had in relation to the disposition which was to be made of us. I am intirely indebted to the report made to me by as none of us were ever put on any trial. gave an account of which the following is the substance as far as my memory serves me, “That they held a court martial and sentenced us to be shot at eight o Clock the next morning after the court martial was holden in the publick square, in the presence of our familis, that this court martial was composed [p. [15]]
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