Sidney Rigdon, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​ Sworn Says​> I arived in , Caldwill county missouri on the fourth of April 1837 <​1838​> and injoiyed peace and quietness in common with the rest of the citizens untill the August following when great excitement was created by the office seekers. attempts were made to prevent the citizens of from voting. Soon after the election, which took place in the early part of August. The citizens of were threatened with violence from those of and other counties adjacent to .
This the August 1838 I may date as the time of the beginning of all the troubles of our people in and in all the counties around and indeed all who were living in the , <​where our people were living.​> We had lived in peace after I lived in the which was from the April previous, untill this time, but from this time till we were all out of the , it was but one scene of violence following another in quick succession. There were at this time settlements in , Carroll, , and , counties, as will is <​as​> some famlies living in other counties, A semultanious movement was made in all the counties, where settlements were made in every part of the , which soon became violent, and threatnings were heard from every quarter publick meeting were held and the most inflamatory speeches made, and resolutions passed which denounced all the citizens of these counties in the most bitter and rancorous manner. These resolutions were published in the papers, and the most extensive cerculation given to them that the presses of the country were capable of giving. The first regular mob that assembled was in Carroll , and their effects were directed against the settlements made in that declaring their determination to drive out of the all the citizens, who were of our religion and that indiscrimenately, without regard to any thing else but their religeon. The only evidence necessary <​to​> dispossess any individu [p. 1]
Sworn Says I arived in , Caldwill county missouri on the fourth of April 1838 and injoiyed peace and quietness in common with the rest of the citizens untill the August following when great excitement was created by the office seekers. attempts were made to prevent the citizens of from voting. Soon after the election, which took place in the early part of August. The citizens of were threatened with violence from those of and other counties adjacent to .
This the August 1838 I may date as the time of the beginning of all the troubles of our people in and in all the counties in the , where our people were living. We had lived in peace the April previous, untill this time, but from this time till we were all out of the , it was but one scene of violence following another in quick succession. There were at this time settlements in , Carroll, , and , counties, as will as some famlies living in other counties, A semultanious movement was made in all the counties, where settlements were made in every part of the , which soon became violent, and threatnings were heard from every quarter publick meeting were held and the most inflamatory speeches made, and resolutions passed which denounced all the citizens of these counties in the most bitter and rancorous manner. These resolutions were published in the papers, and the most extensive cerculation given to them that the presses of the country were capable of giving. The first regular mob that assembled was in , and their effects were directed against the settlements made in that declaring their determination to drive out of the all the citizens, who were of our religion and that indiscrimenately, without regard to any thing else but their religeon. The only evidence necessary to dispossess any individu [p. 1]
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