Docket Entry, 1–circa 6 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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the s attorney under at our trial & who at that time stated that the mormons, that the Mormons ought to be hung with out judge or jury, he the said judge, made out a mittimus without day or date, ordering the sheriff to take us to Columbia. The Sheriff selected four men to guard five of us. We then took a circuitous route, crossing prairies sixteen miles without houses, & after travelling three days the sheriff & I were together, by ourselves five miles from any of the rest of the company, for sixteen miles at a stretch. The Sheriff here observed to me, that he wished to God he was at home & your friends & you also. The Sheriff then showed me the mittimus, & he found it had neither day nor date to it; & said the inhabitants of would be surprised that the prisoners had not left them sooner; & said he, by God, I shall not go much further. We were then near Yellow Creek & there were no houses, nearer one was than sixteen miles & eleven another way; except right on the creek. Here a part of the guard took a spree while the balance helped us to mount our horses which we purchased from <​of​> them & for which they were paid. Here we took a change of venue and went to without difficulty, where we found our families, who had been driven out of the under the exterminating order of I never knew of Joseph Smith’s holding any office civil or military or using any undue influence in religious matters, during the whole routine of which I have been speaking.
, Sworn. Says I arrived in Caldwell county, Missouri, on the 4th of April, 1839 [1838], & enjoyed peace & quietness in common with the rest of the citizens until the August following when great excitement was created by the office seekers. Attempts were made to prevent the citizens of from voting. Soon after the election which took place, in the early part of August, the citizens of were threatened with violence, from those of , and other counties adjacent to .
This the August 1838, I may date as the time of the beginning of all the troubles of our people in , & in all the counties of <​in​> the where our people were living. We had lived in peace from the April previous until this time, but from this time, till we were all out of the , it was but one scene of violence following another in quick succession.
There were at this time settlements in , , Carroll, , & counties, as well as some families living in other counties. A [p. 132]
the s attorney under at our trial & who at that time stated that the mormons, that the Mormons ought to be hung with out judge or jury, he the said judge, made out a mittimus without day or date, ordering the sheriff to take us to Columbia. The Sheriff selected four men to guard five of us. We then took a circuitous route, crossing prairies sixteen miles without houses, & after travelling three days the sheriff & I were together, by ourselves five miles from any of the rest of the company, for sixteen miles at a stretch. The Sheriff here observed to me, that he wished to God he was at home & your friends & you also. The Sheriff then showed me the mittimus, & he found it had neither day nor date to it; & said the inhabitants of would be surprised that the prisoners had not left them sooner; & said he, by God, I shall not go much further. We were then near Yellow Creek & there were no houses, nearer one was than sixteen miles & eleven another way; except right on the creek. Here a part of the guard took a spree while the balance helped us to mount our horses which we purchased of them & for which they were paid. Here we took a change of venue and went to without difficulty, where we found our families, who had been driven out of the under the exterminating order of I never knew of Joseph Smith’s holding any office civil or military or using any undue influence in religious matters, during the whole routine of which I have been speaking.
, Sworn. Says I arrived in Caldwell county, Missouri, on the 4th of April, 1839 [1838], & enjoyed peace & quietness in common with the rest of the citizens until the August following when great excitement was created by the office seekers. Attempts were made to prevent the citizens of from voting. Soon after the election which took place, in the early part of August, the citizens of were threatened with violence, from those of , and other counties adjacent to .
This the August 1838, I may date as the time of the beginning of all the troubles of our people in , & in all the counties in the where our people were living. We had lived in peace from the April previous until this time, but from this time, till we were all out of the , it was but one scene of violence following another in quick succession.
There were at this time settlements in , , Carroll, , & counties, as well as some families living in other counties. A [p. 132]
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