Docket Entry, 1–circa 6 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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justice, or that he has guilty of “murder, treason, , theft, & Stealing,” the crimes he was charged with by when he delivered him over to the civil authorities & he supposes that the learned did not know but there was a diference between, larceny theft & stealing.”
The also says that they compelled the brethren to give away their property, by executing a Deed of Trust, at the point of the bayonet, & that Judge Cameron stood & saw the Mormons sign away their property, & then he & others would run & kick up their heels, & and said they were glad of it & “we have nothing to trouble us now.” This judge also said, God damn them, see how well they feel now, also said he had authority to make what treaties he pleased & the would sanction it.
The also Stated that he never transgressed any of the laws of & he never knew a Latter Day Saint break a law while there. He also said that if they would search the records of , , or counties, they could not find one record of crime against a Latter Day Saint, or even in so far as knew.
sworn. saith he has known been acquainted with Joseph Smith, Senior for the last twelve years & that he removed to the state of in the year 1831, when the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was organized agreeably to the law of the land.— No particular difficulty took place until after some hundreds had assembled in that land who believed in the book of Mormon & Revelations which were given through said Joseph Smith, Senior. After nearly two years of peace had elapsed, a strong prejudice among the different sects arose, declaring that Joseph Smith was a false prophet & ought to die, and I heard hundreds say, they had never known the man but if they could come across him, they would kill him as soon as they would a rattle Snake. Frequently heard them say of those who believed in the doctrine he promulgated, that if they did not renounce it they they would exterminate or drive them from the in which they lived. On enquiring of them if they had any prejudice against us they said no, but Joe Smith ought to die & if he ever comes to this country we will kill him God damn him.
Matters went on thus until sometime in the summer of 1833 when mobs assembled in considerable bodies, frequently visiting private houses [p. 120]
justice, or that he has guilty of “murder, treason, , theft, & Stealing,” the crimes he was charged with by when he delivered him over to the civil authorities & he supposes that the learned did not know but there was a diference between, larceny theft & stealing.”
The also says that they compelled the brethren to give away their property, by executing a Deed of Trust, at the point of the bayonet, & that Judge Cameron stood & saw the Mormons sign away their property, & then he & others would run & kick up their heels, & and said they were glad of it & “we have nothing to trouble us now.” This judge also said, God damn them, see how well they feel now, also said he had authority to make what treaties he pleased & the would sanction it.
The also Stated that he never transgressed any of the laws of & he never knew a Latter Day Saint break a law while there. He also said that if they would search the records of , , or counties, they could not find one record of crime against a Latter Day Saint, or even in so far as knew.
sworn. saith he has known been acquainted with Joseph Smith, Senior for the last twelve years & that he removed to the state of in the year 1831, when the church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints was organized agreeably to the law of the land.— No particular difficulty took place until after some hundreds had assembled in that land who believed in the book of Mormon & Revelations which were given through said Joseph Smith, Senior. After nearly two years of peace had elapsed, a strong prejudice among the different sects arose, declaring that Joseph Smith was a false prophet & ought to die, and I heard hundreds say, they had never known the man but if they could come across him, they would kill him as soon as they would a rattle Snake. Frequently heard them say of those who believed in the doctrine he promulgated, that if they did not renounce it they they would exterminate or drive them from the in which they lived. On enquiring of them if they had any prejudice against us they said no, but Joe Smith ought to die & if he ever comes to this country we will kill him God damn him.
Matters went on thus until sometime in the summer of 1833 when mobs assembled in considerable bodies, frequently visiting private houses [p. 120]
Page 120