Sidney Rigdon, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [20]
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and the party started for . I waited with painfull anxiety for their return. After a number of days they returned I listened to all they said to find out if possible what they had <​done.​> one night I think the very night after their return I heard them relating to one some of those who had not been with them the events of their adventure inquiry was made about their success in the particular object of their visit to . The substance of what the said in answer was, that they had passed and repassed both houses and saw the females, but there were so many men about the that they dare not venture for fear of being detected and their numbers were not sufficient if r◊◊ to accomplish any thing if they had made the attempt, and they came off without trying.
No civil process of any kind had been issued against us we were there held in duress without knowing what for, or what charges were to be prefered against us. At last after long suspence who comes into the prison but presenting himself about as awkwardly as at first, and informed us that we were to be put into the hands of the civil authorities he said he did not know precisely what crimes would be charged against us, but they would be within the range, of Treason, murder, , , theft, and stealing, here again another smile was forced, and I could <​not​> refrain, at the expence of this would be great <​man​> in whom, he said, the faith of the state of was pledged. After long and awfull suspence. The notable , judge of the circuit court, took his seat and we were ordered before him for trial. Esq Prosecuting attorney, all things being aranged the trial opened. No papers were read, to us, no charges of any kind were prefered, nor did we know against what we had to plead, our crimes had yet to be found out
At the commencement we requested that we might be tried seperately but this was refused, and we all <​were​> all put on trial together. Witnesses appeared and the swearing [p. [20]]
and the party started for . I waited with painfull anxiety for their return. After a number of days they returned I listened to all they said to find out if possible what they had done. one night I think the very night after their return I heard them relating to some of those who had not been with them the events of their adventure inquiry was made about their success in the particular object of their visit to . The substance of what the said in answer was, that they had passed and repassed both houses and saw the females, but there were so many men about the that they dare not venture for fear of being detected and their numbers were not sufficient to accomplish any thing if they had made the attempt, and they came off without trying.
No civil process of any kind had been issued against us we were there held in duress without knowing what for, or what charges were to be prefered against us. At last after long suspence comes into the prison presenting himself about as awkwardly as at first, and informed us that we were to be put into the hands of the civil authorities he said he did not know precisely what crimes would be charged against us, but they would be within the range, of Treason, murder, , , theft, and stealing, here again another smile was forced, and I could not refrain, at the expence of this would be great man in whom, he said, the faith of the state of was pledged. After long and awfull suspence. The notable , judge of the circuit court, took his seat and we were ordered before him for trial. Esq Prosecuting attorney, all things being aranged the trial opened. No papers were read, to us, no charges of any kind were prefered, nor did we know against what we had to plead, our crimes had yet to be found out
At the commencement we requested that we might be tried seperately but this was refused, and we were all put on trial together. Witnesses appeared and the swearing [p. [20]]
Page [20]