Sidney Rigdon, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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swear falsely, and in many instances I cannot see how it could avoid being intentional on the part of those who testified for all <​of​> them did swear things that I am satisfied they knew to be false at the time, and it would be hard to persuade <​me​> to the contrary. There were things there said so utterly without foundation in truth, so much so, that the persons swearing must, at the time of swearing, have known it. The best construction I can ever put on <​it​> is that they swore things to be true which they did not know to be so, and this, to me, is wilfull purjery.
This trial lasted for a long time, the result of which was that I was ordered to be discharged from prison, and the rest remanded back; but I was told by those who professed to be my friends that it would not do for me to go out of jail at that time as the mob were watching and would most certainly take my life, and when I got out that I must leave the , for the mob availing themselves of the exterminating order <​of​> , would, if I were found in the surely take my life, that I had no way to escape them but felee flee with all speed from the . It was some ten days after this before I dare leave the , at last the evening came, in which I was to leave the Every preperation was made that could be made for my escape there was a carriage ready to take me in and carry me off with all speed a pilot was ready one who was well acquainted with the country to pilot me through the country so that I might not go on any of the publick roads, my wife came to the to accompany me of whose society I had been deprived fr four months, just at dark the sheriff and jailor came to the with our supper I sat down and eat. there were a number watching after I had supped I whispered to the jailor to blow out all the candles, but one and step away from the door with that one. All this was done the sheriff then took me by the arm and an apparent scuffle ensued, so much so that those who were watching, did not know who it was the sheriff was scuffling with. The sheriff kept pushing me toward the [p. [23]]
swear falsely, and in many instances I cannot see how it could avoid being intentional on the part of those who testified for all of them did swear things that I am satisfied they knew to be false at the time, and it would be hard to persuade me to the contrary. There were things there said so utterly without foundation in truth, so much so, that the persons swearing must, at the time of swearing, have known it. The best construction I can ever put on it is that they swore things to be true which they did not know to be so, and this, to me, is wilfull purjery.
This trial lasted for a long time, the result of which was that I was ordered to be discharged from prison, and the rest remanded back; but I was told by those who professed to be my friends that it would not do for me to go out of jail at that time as the mob were watching and would most certainly take my life, and when I got out that I must leave the , for the mob availing themselves of the exterminating order of , would, if I were found in the surely take my life, that I had no way to escape them but flee with all speed from the . It was some ten days after this before I dare leave the , at last the evening came, in which I was to leave the Every preperation was made that could be made for my escape there was a carriage ready to take me in and carry me off with all speed a pilot was ready one who was well acquainted with the country to pilot me through the country so that I might not go on any of the publick roads, my wife came to the to accompany me of whose society I had been deprived fr four months, just at dark the sheriff and jailor came to the with our supper I sat down and eat. there were a number watching after I had supped I whispered to the jailor to blow out all the candles, but one and step away from the door with that one. All this was done the sheriff then took me by the arm and an apparent scuffle ensued, so much so that those who were watching, did not know who it was the sheriff was scuffling with. The sheriff kept pushing me toward the [p. [23]]
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