Sidney Rigdon, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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a large mob on the Grindstone and his custom object was to make a descent upon , burn the and kill or disperse the inhabitants: and that it was very necessary that an effective force should be ready to oppose him, or he would accomplish his object. The militia was accordingly called out. He also said that there had better be a strong force sent to to guard the citizens there: he recommended that to avoid any difficulties which might arise they had better go in very small parties, without arms so that no legal advantage could be taken of it. them
I will here give a short account of the courts and internal affairs of for the information of those who are not acquainted with them <​same.​>
has three courts <​of law peculiar​> which belong to the <​that​> peculiarly. The Supreme court. Th Circuit court and the county court, The two former, about the same as in many other states of the . The county court, is composed of three Judges elected by the people of the respective counties. This court is in some respects like the court of Probate in , or the Surrogate’s court of but the powers of this court are more extencive than the courts of , or . The judges, or any one of them, of the county court of , has the power of issuing , in all cases where arrests are made within the county where they preside. They have also all the powers of justices of the peace in civil as well as criminal cases, for instane a warrent may be obtained from one of these judges by affidavit and a person arrested under said <​such​> warrant, from another of these judges. a Habeas Corpus may issue and the person arested be ordered before him, and the character of the arest be inquired into; and if <​in​> the opinion of the judge the person ought not to be holden by virtue of said process, he has power to discharge him. They are considered conservortors of the <​peace—​> and act as such. In the internal regulations of the affairs of [p. [8]]
a large mob on the Grindstone and his object was to make a descent upon , burn the and kill or disperse the inhabitants: and that it was very necessary that an effective force should be ready to oppose him, or he would accomplish his object. The militia was accordingly called out. He also said that there had better be a strong force sent to to guard the citizens there: he recommended that to avoid any difficulties which might arise they had better go in very small parties, without arms so that no legal advantage could be taken of them
I will here give a short account of the courts and internal affairs of for the information of those who are not acquainted with the same.
has three courts of law peculiar to that . The Supreme court. Th Circuit court and the county court, The two former, about the same as in many other states of the . The county court, is composed of three Judges elected by the people of the respective counties. This court is in some respects like the court of Probate in , or the Surrogate’s court of but the powers of this court are more extencive than the courts of , or . The judges, or any one of them, of the county court of , has the power of issuing , in all cases where arrests are made within the county where they preside. They have also all the powers of justices of the peace in civil as well as criminal cases, for instane a warrent may be obtained from one of these judges by affidavit and a person arrested under such warrant, from another of these judges. a Habeas Corpus may issue and the person arested be ordered before him, and the character of the arest be inquired into; and if in the opinion of the judge the person ought not to be holden by virtue of said process, he has power to discharge him. They are considered conservortors of the peace— and act as such. In the internal regulations of the affairs of [p. [8]]
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