Times and Seasons, 1 October 1842

  • Source Note
Page 938
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we consider the great work in which we are engaged, a work that has been looked forward to with delight by the ancient servants of God; a theme about which all the inspired poets have sung, and all the prophets, from the foundation of the world, have wrote—even the “dispensation of the fulness of times, which has been spoken of by ALL the prophets since the world began.” God has reserved us as the honored instruments to participate in the blessings, glories, and privileges, that “prophets and kings desired to see, but died without the sight.
Under these circumstances, blessed with the light and intelligence of heaven, and with direct revelation from the Most High, it behooves us as his people to use the most untiring diligence, and to exert all our energies in the accomplishment of an object so desirable for us to attend to; and so pregnant with importance to the inhabitants of this . The Lord has given us directions in regard to this affair, and has said, “let the House be built by the tithing of my people.” This is a commandment which is binding, which is imperative upon all Gods people, and if we consider ourselves his people, we shall feel ourselves bound under the strongest obligations, even that of duty, to our God to fulfill this requisition. We take pleasure in stating that many of the saints have come forward with willingness and cheerfulness, and have tithed and consecrated all, yea more than could have been required of them; whilst others have relaxed in their duty and have been slow to perform their covenants. We know that of late we have had gloomy times; clouds have been gathering around our horizon, and our atmosphere has been impregnated with the foul effluvia of wanton and unmerited persecution; the life of our prophet has been sought after, and many unpleasant circumstances have transpired which in their nature have had a tendency to damp the energies, and slacken the exertions of the saints in the accomplishment of this great work; and as the building of the is principally depending upon the tenth day’s labor of the inhabitants of this place, when many are slack, as has been the case of late, it has a great tendency to retard the work—to dispirit those who are actively engaged, and who feel zealous in the work, and to derange very materially the plans and designs of the committee. There are some few things that devolve upon us to mention, which, though an unpleasant work, we feel the importance of the cause requires at our hands.
The committee find themselves very much perplexed in consequence of the brethren not coming forward as usual from their different wards, to perform their tenth of labor. They state that they cannot get sufficient stone quarried to supply the stone cutters at the , and that some of them have been obliged to quit work in consequence, and that unless strenuous exertions are immediatley made, and the brethren come up promptly to their duty, the work will be greatly retarded, and perhaps have to stop; at all events the stone cutters will have to stop unless they get an immediate supply of stone. Brethren, such things ought not to be; “let us not be weary in well doing, for we shall reap in due time, if we faint not.” We have commenced a good work—we have been zealously engaged in it—we have spent a great deal of labor, and toil, and our expectations have been great when we have reflected upon the blessings that would flow to us through that medium. Let us begin this next week and continue our labors “until the topstone shall be raised with shoutings of grace! grace unto it!” The committee state that if they have a sufficiency of stone quarried, they can not only be progressing with the work this fall, but the stone cutters can be employed all the winter, and thus have a great quantity of hewn stone ready to commence with as soon as the spring opens which will greatly facilitate the progress of the work.
It may here be necessary to give a word or two of instruction: many of the brethren no doubt out of the best of motives bring guns and watches, and other kinds of property that is not saleable, or easy to dispose of; they give them in at what is considered a fair valuation, yet they are not saleable—they will not purchase either provision or clothing for those that need, neither will they purchase labor, and they lay as useless lumber on the hands of the committee. It is the especial desire of the committee, and absolutely necessary for the prosperity of the work, that the brethren in town pay their tenth in labor, and not in property.
In regard to the brethren in the country, we would also say a word. Cattle which are neither fit for milking or killing are frequently brought in for tithing, and they lay as dead property on the hands of the commitee—as they have no way of feeding them they are put into the drove, from which several have wandered off and been lost; we would therefore advise the brethren to bring in fat cattle which would immediately supply the hands with beef; or otherwise milch cows, that might be disposed of to advantage. Another word on this subject and we have done. Many of the brethren, in their liberality bring in pumpkins, squashes, potatoes, and other vegetables, if, when they were doing this they could bring a little corn [p. 938]
we consider the great work in which we are engaged, a work that has been looked forward to with delight by the ancient servants of God; a theme about which all the inspired poets have sung, and all the prophets, from the foundation of the world, have wrote—even the “dispensation of the fulness of times, which has been spoken of by ALL the prophets since the world began.” God has reserved us as the honored instruments to participate in the blessings, glories, and privileges, that “prophets and kings desired to see, but died without the sight.
Under these circumstances, blessed with the light and intelligence of heaven, and with direct revelation from the Most High, it behooves us as his people to use the most untiring diligence, and to exert all our energies in the accomplishment of an object so desirable for us to attend to; and so pregnant with importance to the inhabitants of this . The Lord has given us directions in regard to this affair, and has said, “let the House be built by the tithing of my people.” This is a commandment which is binding, which is imperative upon all Gods people, and if we consider ourselves his people, we shall feel ourselves bound under the strongest obligations, even that of duty, to our God to fulfill this requisition. We take pleasure in stating that many of the saints have come forward with willingness and cheerfulness, and have tithed and consecrated all, yea more than could have been required of them; whilst others have relaxed in their duty and have been slow to perform their covenants. We know that of late we have had gloomy times; clouds have been gathering around our horizon, and our atmosphere has been impregnated with the foul effluvia of wanton and unmerited persecution; the life of our prophet has been sought after, and many unpleasant circumstances have transpired which in their nature have had a tendency to damp the energies, and slacken the exertions of the saints in the accomplishment of this great work; and as the building of the is principally depending upon the tenth day’s labor of the inhabitants of this place, when many are slack, as has been the case of late, it has a great tendency to retard the work—to dispirit those who are actively engaged, and who feel zealous in the work, and to derange very materially the plans and designs of the committee. There are some few things that devolve upon us to mention, which, though an unpleasant work, we feel the importance of the cause requires at our hands.
The committee find themselves very much perplexed in consequence of the brethren not coming forward as usual from their different wards, to perform their tenth of labor. They state that they cannot get sufficient stone quarried to supply the stone cutters at the , and that some of them have been obliged to quit work in consequence, and that unless strenuous exertions are immediatley made, and the brethren come up promptly to their duty, the work will be greatly retarded, and perhaps have to stop; at all events the stone cutters will have to stop unless they get an immediate supply of stone. Brethren, such things ought not to be; “let us not be weary in well doing, for we shall reap in due time, if we faint not.” We have commenced a good work—we have been zealously engaged in it—we have spent a great deal of labor, and toil, and our expectations have been great when we have reflected upon the blessings that would flow to us through that medium. Let us begin this next week and continue our labors “until the topstone shall be raised with shoutings of grace! grace unto it!” The committee state that if they have a sufficiency of stone quarried, they can not only be progressing with the work this fall, but the stone cutters can be employed all the winter, and thus have a great quantity of hewn stone ready to commence with as soon as the spring opens which will greatly facilitate the progress of the work.
It may here be necessary to give a word or two of instruction: many of the brethren no doubt out of the best of motives bring guns and watches, and other kinds of property that is not saleable, or easy to dispose of; they give them in at what is considered a fair valuation, yet they are not saleable—they will not purchase either provision or clothing for those that need, neither will they purchase labor, and they lay as useless lumber on the hands of the committee. It is the especial desire of the committee, and absolutely necessary for the prosperity of the work, that the brethren in town pay their tenth in labor, and not in property.
In regard to the brethren in the country, we would also say a word. Cattle which are neither fit for milking or killing are frequently brought in for tithing, and they lay as dead property on the hands of the commitee—as they have no way of feeding them they are put into the drove, from which several have wandered off and been lost; we would therefore advise the brethren to bring in fat cattle which would immediately supply the hands with beef; or otherwise milch cows, that might be disposed of to advantage. Another word on this subject and we have done. Many of the brethren, in their liberality bring in pumpkins, squashes, potatoes, and other vegetables, if, when they were doing this they could bring a little corn [p. 938]
Page 938