History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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from the pockets of the day-labourer, or the widow and  the fatherless, had passed by with a stif neck and a  cold heart, scorning the virtuous because they were  poor, and Lording over those who were subjected to  suffer the miseries of this life.
Alternately did these, with a swift reflection of the  words of the holy messenger,—“Remember, that he who  does this work, who is thus favored of the Lord, must  do it with his eye single to the glory of the same,  and the welfare and restoration of the scattered rem nants of the house of Israel”—rush upon his mind  with the quickness of electricity. Here was a strugle in deed; for when he calmly reflected upon his errand,  he knew that if God did not give, he could not  obtain; and again, with the thought or hope of obta ining, his mind would be carried back to its form er reflections of poverty, abuce,— wealth, grandure and  ease, until before arriving at the place described, this  wholly occupied his desires; and when he thought  upon the fact of what was previously shown him,  it was only with an assurance that he should obta in, and accomplish his desires in relieving himself  and friends from want.
A history of the inhabitants who peopled this conti nent, previous to its being discovered to Europeans by Col umbus, must be interesting to every man;  and as it would develope the important fact, that the  present race were descendants of Abraham, and were to  be remembered in the immutable covenant of the Most  High to that man, and be restored to a knowledge of the  gospel, that they, with all nations might rejoice, seem ed to inspire further thoughts of gain and incom[e] from  such a valuable history. Surely, thought he every man  will sieze with eagerness, this knowledge, and this in calculable incom will be mine. Enough to raise the  expectations of any one of like inexperience, placed  in similar circumstances. But the important point  in this matter is, that man does not see as the Lord,  neither are his purposes like his. The small things  of this life are but dust in comparison with salvation [p. 84]
from the pockets of the day-labourer, or the widow and the fatherless, had passed by with a stif neck and a cold heart, scorning the virtuous because they were poor, and Lording over those who were subjected to suffer the miseries of this life.
Alternately did these, with a swift reflection of the words of the holy messenger,—“Remember, that he who does this work, who is thus favored of the Lord, must do it with his eye single to the glory of the same, and the welfare and restoration of the scattered remnants of the house of Israel”—rush upon his mind with the quickness of electricity. Here was a strugle indeed; for when he calmly reflected upon his errand, he knew that if God did not give, he could not obtain; and again, with the thought or hope of obtaining, his mind would be carried back to its former reflections of poverty, abuce,— wealth, grandure and ease, until before arriving at the place described, this wholly occupied his desires; and when he thought upon the fact of what was previously shown him, it was only with an assurance that he should obtain, and accomplish his desires in relieving himself and friends from want.
A history of the inhabitants who peopled this continent, previous to its being discovered to Europeans by Columbus, must be interesting to every man; and as it would develope the important fact, that the present race were descendants of Abraham, and were to be remembered in the immutable covenant of the Most High to that man, and be restored to a knowledge of the gospel, that they, with all nations might rejoice, seemed to inspire further thoughts of gain and income from such a valuable history. Surely, thought he every man will sieze with eagerness, this knowledge, and this incalculable incom will be mine. Enough to raise the expectations of any one of like inexperience, placed in similar circumstances. But the important point in this matter is, that man does not see as the Lord, neither are his purposes like his. The small things of this life are but dust in comparison with salvation [p. 84]
Page 84