History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 85
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and eternal life.
Alternately did these, It is sufficient to say that such  were his reflections during his walk of from two to three mi les: the distance from his ’s house to the place pointed  out. And to use his own words it seemed as though two  invisible powers were influencing or striving to influence  his mind—one with the reflection that if he obtained the  object of his pursuit, it would be through the mercy  and condescention of the Lord, and that every act or  performance in relation to it, must be in strict according accor dance with the instruction of that personage, who com municated the inteligence to him first; and the other  with the tho’ts and reflections like those previously  mentioned—contrasting his former and present cir cumstances in life with those to come. That precio us instruction recorded on the sacred page—pray  always—which was expresly impressed upon him,  was at length entirely forgotten, and as I previously  remarked, a fixed determination to obtain and  agrandize himself, ocupied his mind when he arri ved at the place where the record was found.
I must now give you some description of the place  where, and the manner in which these records were  deposited.
You are acquainted with the mail road from  , Wayne Co. to , Ontario Co. N.Y.  and also, as you pass from the former to the latter  place, before arriving at the little village of , say from three to four, or about four miles from  , you pass a large hill on the east side of  the road. Why I say large, is because it is as large  perhaps, as any in that country. To a person acquainted  with this road, a description would be unnecessary,  as it is the largest and rises the highest of any on  that rout. The north end rises quite sudden until  it assumes a level with the more southerly extremi ty, and I think I may say an elevation higher than  at the south a short distance, say half or three  fourths of a mile. As you pass toward it lessens gradually until the surface assumes [p. 85]
and eternal life.
It is sufficient to say that such were his reflections during his walk of from two to three miles: the distance from his ’s house to the place pointed out. And to use his own words it seemed as though two invisible powers were influencing or striving to influence his mind—one with the reflection that if he obtained the object of his pursuit, it would be through the mercy and condescention of the Lord, and that every act or performance in relation to it, must be in strict accordance with the instruction of that personage, who communicated the inteligence to him first; and the other with the tho’ts and reflections like those previously mentioned—contrasting his former and present circumstances in life with those to come. That precious instruction recorded on the sacred page—pray always—which was expresly impressed upon him, was at length entirely forgotten, and as I previously remarked, a fixed determination to obtain and agrandize himself, ocupied his mind when he arrived at the place where the record was found.
I must now give you some description of the place where, and the manner in which these records were deposited.
You are acquainted with the mail road from , Wayne Co. to , Ontario Co. N.Y. and also, as you pass from the former to the latter place, before arriving at the little village of , say from three to four, or about four miles from , you pass a large hill on the east side of the road. Why I say large, is because it is as large perhaps, as any in that country. To a person acquainted with this road, a description would be unnecessary, as it is the largest and rises the highest of any on that rout. The north end rises quite sudden until it assumes a level with the more southerly extremity, and I think I may say an elevation higher than at the south a short distance, say half or three fourths of a mile. As you pass toward it lessens gradually until the surface assumes [p. 85]
Page 85