History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 86
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a level with the more southerly extremity, and  I think I may, its common level, or is broken by  other smaller hills or ridges, water courses and ravines.  I think I am justified in saying that this is the  highest hill for some distance round, and I am  certain that its appearance, as it rises so suddenly  from a plain on the north, must attract the  notice of the traveller as he passes by.
At about one mile west rises another ridge  of less height, running parallel with the former,  leaving a beautiful vale between. The soil is  of the first quality for the country, and un der a state of cultivation, which gives a prosp ect at once imposing, when one reflects on the  fact, that here, between these hills, the entire po wer and national strength of both the Jaredi tes and Nephites were destroyed.
By turning to the 529th and 530th pages of the  book of Mormon you will read Mormon’s account  of the last great struggle of his people, as they  were encamped round this hill Cumorah. (it is  printed Camorah, which is an error.) In this  vally fell the remaining strength and pride  of a once powerful people, the Nephites—once  so highly favored of the Lord, but at that time  in darkness, doomed to suffer extermination  by the hand of their barbarous and uncivilized  brethren. From the top of this hill, Mormon,  with a few others, after the battle, gazed with hor ror upon the mangled remains of those who,  the day before, were filled with anxiety, hope  or doubt. A few had fled to the South, who  were hunted down by the victorious party, and  all who would not deny the Saviour and his  religion, were put to death. Mormon himself,  according to the record of his son Moroni, was  also slain.
But a long time previous to this disaster it appears  from his own account, he foresaw approaching destruct ion. In fact, if he perused the records of his fathers, [p. 86]
its common level, or is broken by other smaller hills or ridges, water courses and ravines. I think I am justified in saying that this is the highest hill for some distance round, and I am certain that its appearance, as it rises so suddenly from a plain on the north, must attract the notice of the traveller as he passes by.
At about one mile west rises another ridge of less height, running parallel with the former, leaving a beautiful vale between. The soil is of the first quality for the country, and under a state of cultivation, which gives a prospect at once imposing, when one reflects on the fact, that here, between these hills, the entire power and national strength of both the Jaredites and Nephites were destroyed.
By turning to the 529th and 530th pages of the book of Mormon you will read Mormon’s account of the last great struggle of his people, as they were encamped round this hill Cumorah. (it is printed Camorah, which is an error.) In this vally fell the remaining strength and pride of a once powerful people, the Nephites—once so highly favored of the Lord, but at that time in darkness, doomed to suffer extermination by the hand of their barbarous and uncivilized brethren. From the top of this hill, Mormon, with a few others, after the battle, gazed with horror upon the mangled remains of those who, the day before, were filled with anxiety, hope or doubt. A few had fled to the South, who were hunted down by the victorious party, and all who would not deny the Saviour and his religion, were put to death. Mormon himself, according to the record of his son Moroni, was also slain.
But a long time previous to this disaster it appears from his own account, he foresaw approaching destruction. In fact, if he perused the records of his fathers, [p. 86]
Page 86