John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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had distinguished themselves in the battle, and the Mormons kept a  look out that night. The next morning news of the battle came to  , and it was stated and believed that they were gathering on  both sides, in ; that two Mormons had been killed, and that the  citizens would not let the Mormons bury them. cal led for volunteers, and raised about one hundred and fifty men, who  went out to under arms. Smith and went with them.  When they got to they did not meet with any gathering of the  mob, though it was said there was a collection at . They also  found that none had been killed. Instead of returning home again, as  they ought to have done, they took a notion to make the citizens agree  to live in peace, and not come out in mobs. They went to the house  of , a justice of the peace, and compelled him to sign a  writing to that effect. After staying a day or two, and trying to make  some two or three others sign the paper, they went home. But the  citizens of were not satisfied. went to and  entered complaint. Others went to other parts and made general  complaint against the Mormons. Smith, , and others, they said,  had broken the law by going into armed, and making  sign the paper. It was said that and J. Smith would not be  taken, but would die first.
Some one or two meetings were got up in , in which they  took some exceptions to ’s orations, but they resolved to do  nothing contrary to law, nor approbate a mob. This, I thought had  a good effect in suppressing unlawful proceedings. But the law must  be enforced. A writ was issued for Smith and , and the she riff, it is said, informed of it, but, through fear of ’s threat enings, desisted from trying to take him, but went to for  advice. He advised him to try to serve the precept, but, if re sisted, then command assistance of the citizens, and if they were resis ted by a superior force, then to call for the militia, until he got force  enough. Runners went into other counties to solicit assistance.  They requested the citizens to gather in by a day appointed, and be  in readiness to assist the sheriff in taking . Accordingly they  gathered in to a considerable number. This excited and alarmed the  Mormons. They began to think there was some other object in view  besides taking ; for Smith had previously told the sheriff that he  had never resisted, but was perfectly willing to surrender, and said he  would persuade to do so. For this purpose he sent for  to come to and see him, which he did, and agreed to submit,  saying that the sheriff had never attempted to take him. The citizens  continued to gather, and news came to Smith that there would be four  thousand together in a few days. This alarmed Smith, and he sent a  messenger to to come out to and see him,  and to advise what to do. He did so, and also went to , and  advised Smith and , and such others as were accused, to surren der, which they did, and were tried before , and bound  over: then and returned home. [p. 34]
had distinguished themselves in the battle, and the Mormons kept a look out that night. The next morning news of the battle came to , and it was stated and believed that they were gathering on both sides, in ; that two Mormons had been killed, and that the citizens would not let the Mormons bury them. called for volunteers, and raised about one hundred and fifty men, who went out to under arms. Smith and went with them. When they got to they did not meet with any gathering of the mob, though it was said there was a collection at . They also found that none had been killed. Instead of returning home again, as they ought to have done, they took a notion to make the citizens agree to live in peace, and not come out in mobs. They went to the house of , a justice of the peace, and compelled him to sign a writing to that effect. After staying a day or two, and trying to make some two or three others sign the paper, they went home. But the citizens of were not satisfied. went to and entered complaint. Others went to other parts and made general complaint against the Mormons. Smith, , and others, they said, had broken the law by going into armed, and making sign the paper. It was said that and J. Smith would not be taken, but would die first.
Some one or two meetings were got up in , in which they took some exceptions to ’s orations, but they resolved to do nothing contrary to law, nor approbate a mob. This, I thought had a good effect in suppressing unlawful proceedings. But the law must be enforced. A writ was issued for Smith and , and the sheriff, it is said, informed of it, but, through fear of ’s threatenings, desisted from trying to take him, but went to for advice. He advised him to try to serve the precept, but, if resisted, then command assistance of the citizens, and if they were resisted by a superior force, then to call for the militia, until he got force enough. Runners went into other counties to solicit assistance. They requested the citizens to gather in by a day appointed, and be in readiness to assist the sheriff in taking . Accordingly they gathered in to a considerable number. This excited and alarmed the Mormons. They began to think there was some other object in view besides taking ; for Smith had previously told the sheriff that he had never resisted, but was perfectly willing to surrender, and said he would persuade to do so. For this purpose he sent for to come to and see him, which he did, and agreed to submit, saying that the sheriff had never attempted to take him. The citizens continued to gather, and news came to Smith that there would be four thousand together in a few days. This alarmed Smith, and he sent a messenger to to come out to and see him, and to advise what to do. He did so, and also went to , and advised Smith and , and such others as were accused, to surrender, which they did, and were tried before , and bound over: then and returned home. [p. 34]
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