John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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shortly after removed there wirh [with] their families, and increased their  settlement as fast as they could consistently.
Chapter 16
CHAPTER XVI.
 
Support of Smith and —Spirit excited—Union necessary—Salt sermon—Dis senters expelled—Murmuring put down.
 
When Smith and first moved to they said that  they did not intend to meddle with temporal concerns, but attend to  their spiritual calling, and they relied upon the donations of the church  for their support; but, after a while, it was thought best by the high  eouncil [council] to give them some certain amount each year, which should be  sufficient to support them. They were to labor in word and doctrine,  to write for and superintend the press, and to look to the welfare of  the church.
Notwithstanding the dissenters had left the church, yet the old strife  kept up, and Smith and , with others, complained much of the  ill treatment they had received from the dissenters and others; they  said they had been persecuted from time to time with vexatious law suits; that mobs had arisen up against them, time after time; that they  had been harassed to death, as it were, for seven or eight years, and  they were determined to bear it no longer, for they had rather die  than suffer such things; and it was the will of God that the saints  should fight [to?] their death rather than suffer such things; that if the church  would be united, and exercise faith in God, he would protect them,  though their enemies were ever so numerous. But in order to get  protection and favor from God, they must become one, and be perfect ly united in all things; cleanse themselves from every kind of pollu tion, and keep the whole law of God; and, if they would do this, God  would strengthen them against their enemies, his arm should be their  arm, and the time was not far distant when, if they purified themselves  properly, one should be able to choose his thousand, and to put their  ten thousand to flight.
This kind of preaching was the chief topic of conversation all last  summer [1838], until many of the church became inspired with the belief that  God would enable them to stand against anything, even the State of  , or the , if they should come in a mob. Many  of the church, however, became disgusted with these things, and look ed upon them as great inconsistencies, and calculated to bring swift  destruction upon the church; but such was the influence of the presi dency over the church, that it was of no use to say anything, for the  Lord, they supposed, was going to do great things, which would re quire great faith, and they must prepare for it. For this end, much  was to be done, and the scripture says, “If ye are agreed, as touching  any one thing, it shall be done,” consequently, to become one was  very essential, and they must be well united in all things, and this,  though a great work, must, and should be, performed at all hazards [p. 29]
shortly after removed there wirh with their families, and increased their settlement as fast as they could consistently.
Chapter 16
CHAPTER XVI.
 
Support of Smith and —Spirit excited—Union necessary—Salt sermon—Dissenters expelled—Murmuring put down.
 
When Smith and first moved to they said that they did not intend to meddle with temporal concerns, but attend to their spiritual calling, and they relied upon the donations of the church for their support; but, after a while, it was thought best by the high eouncil council to give them some certain amount each year, which should be sufficient to support them. They were to labor in word and doctrine, to write for and superintend the press, and to look to the welfare of the church.
Notwithstanding the dissenters had left the church, yet the old strife kept up, and Smith and , with others, complained much of the ill treatment they had received from the dissenters and others; they said they had been persecuted from time to time with vexatious lawsuits; that mobs had arisen up against them, time after time; that they had been harassed to death, as it were, for seven or eight years, and they were determined to bear it no longer, for they had rather die than suffer such things; and it was the will of God that the saints should fight to their death rather than suffer such things; that if the church would be united, and exercise faith in God, he would protect them, though their enemies were ever so numerous. But in order to get protection and favor from God, they must become one, and be perfectly united in all things; cleanse themselves from every kind of pollution, and keep the whole law of God; and, if they would do this, God would strengthen them against their enemies, his arm should be their arm, and the time was not far distant when, if they purified themselves properly, one should be able to choose his thousand, and to put their ten thousand to flight.
This kind of preaching was the chief topic of conversation all last summer 1838, until many of the church became inspired with the belief that God would enable them to stand against anything, even the State of , or the , if they should come in a mob. Many of the church, however, became disgusted with these things, and looked upon them as great inconsistencies, and calculated to bring swift destruction upon the church; but such was the influence of the presidency over the church, that it was of no use to say anything, for the Lord, they supposed, was going to do great things, which would require great faith, and they must prepare for it. For this end, much was to be done, and the scripture says, “If ye are agreed, as touching any one thing, it shall be done,” consequently, to become one was very essential, and they must be well united in all things, and this, though a great work, must, and should be, performed at all hazards [p. 29]
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