John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 38
image
I heard nothing from the leaders, but in the camp it was said that they meant not only to scatter the mob, but also to destroy those places that harbored them; that and Millport were of that number; that the time had arrived for the riches of the gentiles to be consecrated to the house of Israel, but they meant to confine themselves to the mob characters in their plunderings. They conjectured that mob after mob, as they termed it, would arise against them, which they would have to subdue, one after another, even till they should reach , where said he meant to winter. Many had the weakness to believe that God would enable them to do it.
As yet they had found no citizens collected in , save those few in ; though, when we started from , it was currently reported, and believed by all, that there were five hundred in Millport, and that the next day there would be eight hundred to commence operations. On Friday morning I returned to , with , who had come out the day before with some provisions.
When they found no citizens gathered together against them, they ought to have been peaceable, and merely stood on the defensive; but they had become too desperate in feeling for that, and resolved to clear from every thing in the shape of what they called mobs, which they did effectually in the course of that and the next week. It appeared to me also that the love of pillage grew upon them very fast, for they plundered every kind of property they could get hold of, and burnt many cabins in , some say eighty, and some say one hundred and fifty.
They also went with a company to , and took a piece of ordnance, which had been brought there by the company that came from Carroll county. After this, most of those who belonged to returned home.
Chapter 22
CHAPTER XXII.
 
Destructionist and destroying angel—Battle with —Great excitement and people in arms— and escape— and the militia—Battle at .
 
, meanwhile, was well guarded, for they heard they were to be attacked by , with a company from the Platte. But he did not attempt it. They also heard that a company was coming from Buncum [Buncombe], and they organised a company of ten men, that were called the Destructionists, whose commander was called the Destroying Angel. Their business was, to watch the movements of the citizens, and if they gathered in Buncum, and left the place for , these Destructionists were to slip in behind them, and burn the place. So they were to do, it was said, by , or any other place that should turn out men to injure them. I believe they never attempted to burn either place, though [p. 38]
I heard nothing from the leaders, but in the camp it was said that they meant not only to scatter the mob, but also to destroy those places that harbored them; that and Millport were of that number; that the time had arrived for the riches of the gentiles to be consecrated to the house of Israel, but they meant to confine themselves to the mob characters in their plunderings. They conjectured that mob after mob, as they termed it, would arise against them, which they would have to subdue, one after another, even till they should reach , where said he meant to winter. Many had the weakness to believe that God would enable them to do it.
As yet they had found no citizens collected in , save those few in ; though, when we started from , it was currently reported, and believed by all, that there were five hundred in Millport, and that the next day there would be eight hundred to commence operations. On Friday morning I returned to , with , who had come out the day before with some provisions.
When they found no citizens gathered together against them, they ought to have been peaceable, and merely stood on the defensive; but they had become too desperate in feeling for that, and resolved to clear from every thing in the shape of what they called mobs, which they did effectually in the course of that and the next week. It appeared to me also that the love of pillage grew upon them very fast, for they plundered every kind of property they could get hold of, and burnt many cabins in , some say eighty, and some say one hundred and fifty.
They also went with a company to , and took a piece of ordnance, which had been brought there by the company that came from Carroll county. After this, most of those who belonged to returned home.
Chapter 22
CHAPTER XXII.
 
Destructionist and destroying angel—Battle with —Great excitement and people in arms— and escape— and the militia—Battle at .
 
, meanwhile, was well guarded, for they heard they were to be attacked by , with a company from the Platte. But he did not attempt it. They also heard that a company was coming from Buncum [Buncombe], and they organised a company of ten men, that were called the Destructionists, whose commander was called the Destroying Angel. Their business was, to watch the movements of the citizens, and if they gathered in Buncum, and left the place for , these Destructionists were to slip in behind them, and burn the place. So they were to do, it was said, by , or any other place that should turn out men to injure them. I believe they never attempted to burn either place, though [p. 38]
Page 38