John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 27
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goods, and, shortly after, some fifty or sixty thousand more, as I was  informed; but they did not fully understand the mercantile business,  and, withal, they suffered pride to arise in their hearts, and became  desirous of fine houses, and fine clothes, and indulged too much in  these things, supposing for a few months that they were very rich.  They also spent some thousands of dollars in building a steam mill,  which never profited them anything. They also bought many farms  at extravagant prices, and made part payments, which they after wards lost, by not being able to meet the remaining payments. They  also got up a bank, for which they could get no charter, so they is sued their paper without a charter, and, of course, they could not col lect their pay on notes received for loans, and, after struggling with  it awhile, they broke down.
During their mercantile and banking operations they not only in dulged in pride, but also suffered jealousies to arise among them, and  several persons dissented from the church, and accused the leaders of  the church with bad management, selfishness, seeking for riches,  honor, and dominion, tyranising over the people, and striving con stantly after power and property. On the other hand, the leaders of  the church accused the dissenters with dishonesty, want of faith, and  righteousness, wicked in their intentions, guilty of crimes, such as  stealing, lying, encouraging the making of counterfeit money, &c.; and  this strife or opposition arose to a great height, so that, instead of pul ling together as brethren, they tried every way in their power, seem ingly, to destroy each other; their enemies from without rejoiced at  this, and assisted the dissenters what they could, until Smith and finally were obliged to leave , and, with their families,  came to , in March or April, 1838.
During this strife some of the elders became tired of this scene, and  left ; went to the city of , where he  built up a church.
Chapter 15
CHAPTER XV.
 
Debts, how paid—Difficulty in the church—Smith and visit the church— Presidency changed—Dissenters withdraw—Removal to —New town  commenced, called —Feelings produced—Boasting—Settlement  of .
 
In order to pay the debts in , and elsewhere, many of the  church in turned out their farms and stripped themselves of  property, took orders on the in , and, in their po verty followed Smith and to as soon as practi cable. Some of the dissenters came also, and, notwithstanding they  affected a sort of reconciliation of their difficulties, yet it was plain  that hard feelings existed. and had  served as presidents of the church, in the upper country, from the  time they came from , but some time in the winter of 1836 [p. 27]
goods, and, shortly after, some fifty or sixty thousand more, as I was informed; but they did not fully understand the mercantile business, and, withal, they suffered pride to arise in their hearts, and became desirous of fine houses, and fine clothes, and indulged too much in these things, supposing for a few months that they were very rich. They also spent some thousands of dollars in building a steam mill, which never profited them anything. They also bought many farms at extravagant prices, and made part payments, which they afterwards lost, by not being able to meet the remaining payments. They also got up a bank, for which they could get no charter, so they issued their paper without a charter, and, of course, they could not collect their pay on notes received for loans, and, after struggling with it awhile, they broke down.
During their mercantile and banking operations they not only indulged in pride, but also suffered jealousies to arise among them, and several persons dissented from the church, and accused the leaders of the church with bad management, selfishness, seeking for riches, honor, and dominion, tyranising over the people, and striving constantly after power and property. On the other hand, the leaders of the church accused the dissenters with dishonesty, want of faith, and righteousness, wicked in their intentions, guilty of crimes, such as stealing, lying, encouraging the making of counterfeit money, &c.; and this strife or opposition arose to a great height, so that, instead of pulling together as brethren, they tried every way in their power, seemingly, to destroy each other; their enemies from without rejoiced at this, and assisted the dissenters what they could, until Smith and finally were obliged to leave , and, with their families, came to , in March or April, 1838.
During this strife some of the elders became tired of this scene, and left ; went to the city of , where he built up a church.
Chapter 15
CHAPTER XV.
 
Debts, how paid—Difficulty in the church—Smith and visit the church—Presidency changed—Dissenters withdraw—Removal to —New town commenced, called —Feelings produced—Boasting—Settlement of .
 
In order to pay the debts in , and elsewhere, many of the church in turned out their farms and stripped themselves of property, took orders on the in , and, in their poverty followed Smith and to as soon as practicable. Some of the dissenters came also, and, notwithstanding they affected a sort of reconciliation of their difficulties, yet it was plain that hard feelings existed. and had served as presidents of the church, in the upper country, from the time they came from , but some time in the winter of 1836 [p. 27]
Page 27