John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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I heard one of the militia tell , that a well twenty or  thirty feet deep, was filled up with their dead bodies to within three  feet of the top. These troops, I was told, were from and , and some from Carroll, but by what authority they fell upon  these Mormons I never could learn.

Chapter 23

CHAPTER XXIII.
 
Peace sought for—Militia encamp at —Correspondence with the officers— Breast-work—’s order.
 
On Sunday the fourth of November, we heard that Generals and , with an army, were encamped on .
On Sunday evening Smith came to me to have me accompany   the next day to meet their army with a white flag, in order  to open a correspondence, if possible, and agree upon some terms of  peace. We went in company with and about one  hundred and sixty horsemen. When we got near we  learned that the army had moved on to Log creek, and were making  their way to . We thought proper to return, and it was  with difficulty that we got back, for the militia had come between us  and town. When we arrived, we saw a line of battle drawn up by  the militia, and the Mormons also arrayed to meet them, but the mili tia, for some cause, withdrew to their camp on Goose creek. About  dark, took a white flag, and went into their camp. He  saw and others. , with his troops  from , had joined the army, and they were about thir teen hundred strong. When returned he said that had appointed the next morning at eight o’clock to meet a  committee of Mormons and make proposals of peace. He promised  that no harm should befal us that night; he stated that their object was  to bring the guilty to punishment, but the innocent should have an op portunity to escape before they would attack the place.
That night, the Mormons built a sort of breastwork of rails, house- logs, boards, &c. on that side of town next [to] the army, but it was about  as good a defence as a common fence would be. Much has been said  abroad about the Mormons building forts, entrenchments, &c., but  this breast-work spoken of above is all that they ever had. In the  night both armies were alarmed more or less, each being afraid of an  attack from the other.
Next morning, at the time appointed, , ,  and myself, went with the white flag, and met generals , , and some other officers, who informed us that they were wait ing for , whom they expected soon with the ’s  order; that they were not prepared to make proposals of peace until  it arrived, for they knew not what it would require of them or us.  They agreed to let us know as soon as they received it. At the same [p. 40]
I heard one of the militia tell , that a well twenty or thirty feet deep, was filled up with their dead bodies to within three feet of the top. These troops, I was told, were from and , and some from Carroll, but by what authority they fell upon these Mormons I never could learn.

Chapter 23

CHAPTER XXIII.
 
Peace sought for—Militia encamp at —Correspondence with the officers—Breast-work—’s order.
 
On Sunday the fourth of November, we heard that Generals and , with an army, were encamped on .
On Sunday evening Smith came to me to have me accompany the next day to meet their army with a white flag, in order to open a correspondence, if possible, and agree upon some terms of peace. We went in company with and about one hundred and sixty horsemen. When we got near we learned that the army had moved on to Log creek, and were making their way to . We thought proper to return, and it was with difficulty that we got back, for the militia had come between us and town. When we arrived, we saw a line of battle drawn up by the militia, and the Mormons also arrayed to meet them, but the militia, for some cause, withdrew to their camp on Goose creek. About dark, took a white flag, and went into their camp. He saw and others. , with his troops from , had joined the army, and they were about thirteen hundred strong. When returned he said that had appointed the next morning at eight o’clock to meet a committee of Mormons and make proposals of peace. He promised that no harm should befal us that night; he stated that their object was to bring the guilty to punishment, but the innocent should have an opportunity to escape before they would attack the place.
That night, the Mormons built a sort of breastwork of rails, house-logs, boards, &c. on that side of town next to the army, but it was about as good a defence as a common fence would be. Much has been said abroad about the Mormons building forts, entrenchments, &c., but this breast-work spoken of above is all that they ever had. In the night both armies were alarmed more or less, each being afraid of an attack from the other.
Next morning, at the time appointed, , , and myself, went with the white flag, and met generals , , and some other officers, who informed us that they were waiting for , whom they expected soon with the ’s order; that they were not prepared to make proposals of peace until it arrived, for they knew not what it would require of them or us. They agreed to let us know as soon as they received it. At the same [p. 40]
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