John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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As the Danites had covenanted and agreed to support the heads  of the church in all things, so, of course, they must control the elec tions as well as other matters: therefore they got up a meeting of  their Danite officers on Saturday, before the election, and appointed  a committee, consisting of one man from each township in the ,  who called upon the first presidency to assist them in making out a no mination. Accordingly a ticket was made out to suit them, and a suf ficient number printed that night. The next day another meeting of  the Danites was convened, two hundred or more in number, and these  tickets divided out among them. They agreed to scatter them  throughout the county of , and support it the next morning at  the polls; which they did.
The people supposed that this ticket was from head quarters, and  that it was the will of God that all should go for it. But many saw  that it was taking an undue advantage of the election, and were ex tremely dissatisfied; not so much with the ticket itself as with the prin ciple in which it had been got up, for the ticket was democratic, and  the Mormons, as individuals, are almost universally of that party.  There was some murmuring and finding fault after the election, by  those opposed to the proceedings, but this was soon put down by the  Danite influence.
Chapter 19
CHAPTER XIX.
 
Election in —Unhappy affray—Excitement—Expedition to  —Smith and —Public meeting in —The sheriff—Ga thering in —Trials before .
 
The election in was not conducted in this manner.  Every man there voted as he pleased: but an unhappy affray took  place there.
Feelings existed, as I observed before, between the Mormons and  other citizens on account of their settling the new town of , and filling up the so fast. , a citizen  and candidate, on seeing that the Mormons were not going for him,  made a flaming speech on election day, in which he said, that the Mor mons ought not to be suffered to vote. I was informed, however,  that they were not prohibited; but still, feelings became somewhat ex cited on both sides, though there was but little said, until one of the  Mormons and one of the other citizens got into a conversation, in which  they gave each other the lie: the citizen struck the Mormon, and fol lowed him up for another blow, when he was met by another Mormon,  who knocked him down. From this, one after another, on both sides,  fell into the ranks, and a general conflict was the result. Some were  badly hurt from clubs and boards that were used on both sides. The  Mormons got the better, I believe, in that affray, but left the polls I  was told, soon after it was over. This affray increased the excitement  on both sides. Some of the citizens threatened those Mormons that [p. 33]
As the Danites had covenanted and agreed to support the heads of the church in all things, so, of course, they must control the elections as well as other matters: therefore they got up a meeting of their Danite officers on Saturday, before the election, and appointed a committee, consisting of one man from each township in the , who called upon the first presidency to assist them in making out a nomination. Accordingly a ticket was made out to suit them, and a sufficient number printed that night. The next day another meeting of the Danites was convened, two hundred or more in number, and these tickets divided out among them. They agreed to scatter them throughout the county of , and support it the next morning at the polls; which they did.
The people supposed that this ticket was from head quarters, and that it was the will of God that all should go for it. But many saw that it was taking an undue advantage of the election, and were extremely dissatisfied; not so much with the ticket itself as with the principle in which it had been got up, for the ticket was democratic, and the Mormons, as individuals, are almost universally of that party. There was some murmuring and finding fault after the election, by those opposed to the proceedings, but this was soon put down by the Danite influence.
Chapter 19
CHAPTER XIX.
 
Election in —Unhappy affray—Excitement—Expedition to —Smith and —Public meeting in —The sheriff—Gathering in —Trials before .
 
The election in was not conducted in this manner. Every man there voted as he pleased: but an unhappy affray took place there.
Feelings existed, as I observed before, between the Mormons and other citizens on account of their settling the new town of , and filling up the so fast. , a citizen and candidate, on seeing that the Mormons were not going for him, made a flaming speech on election day, in which he said, that the Mormons ought not to be suffered to vote. I was informed, however, that they were not prohibited; but still, feelings became somewhat excited on both sides, though there was but little said, until one of the Mormons and one of the other citizens got into a conversation, in which they gave each other the lie: the citizen struck the Mormon, and followed him up for another blow, when he was met by another Mormon, who knocked him down. From this, one after another, on both sides, fell into the ranks, and a general conflict was the result. Some were badly hurt from clubs and boards that were used on both sides. The Mormons got the better, I believe, in that affray, but left the polls I was told, soon after it was over. This affray increased the excitement on both sides. Some of the citizens threatened those Mormons that [p. 33]
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