John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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that it was of no use for me to say any thing more; in fact I felt it was  necessary for me to look out for my own safety.

Chapter 21

CHAPTER XXI.
 
Public meeting—Resolutions passed—Volunteers raised—Reflections—Expedition  to —Doings there—New order of consecration—Enthusiastic notions— Plunderings—Piece of ordnance taken.
 
This conversation was on Sunday morning after they returned from  . Smith preached that day pretty much from the same spirit,  and requested a general meeting of all the male members on the next  day. They accordingly met, and passed resolutions to the following  effect. All the members of the church should take hold and help; those  who had been backward in carrying on the warfare should now come  forward, and their property should be consecrated, so far as might be  necessary for the use of the army. If any man undertook to leave the  place, and go to the enemy, he should be stopped and brought back, or  loose his life. As soon as this meeting was over, they collected upon  the public square, and called for volunteers. About two hundred were  raised to go to . Others were raised to guard . A company, called the Fur Company, was raised, for the pur pose of procuring provisions, for pressing teams, and even men some times, into the army in . I now saw plainly that they had  become desperate, and their career would soon end; for I knew that  their doings would soon bring the people on them, and I dreaded the  consequences. I would have been glad to have left the with  my family, but I could not get away; the decree was passed, and there  was no other chance for me and the other dissenters but to pretend  to take hold with the rest. I now understood that they meant to fall  upon and scatter the mob wherever they could find them collected.
The next day, which was Tuesday, they marched to . The following day it snowed, and there was not much done,  except perhaps to lay some plans of operation. The next day a com pany of about eighty mounted men went to , where they found  from ten to twenty men, who fled as they approached the town.  They plundered a store and burnt it, and carried off some other pro perty. Another company of seventy or eighty went to Millport, and  on finding the place pretty much deserted they left it as they found it.  Another company, of about the same size, went on to Grindstone Fork,  and professed themselves to be citizens of Carroll. This they did, I  was told, to find out who was against them. They also committed  some little thefts. Another company, on foot, went somewhere in the  country, and returned with a quantity of plundered property.
During these two days I laid by the fire with a lame leg. I clearly  saw, from the remarks passing through the camp, and from their  doings, that destruction to the Mormons was nigh at hand. I was  astonished at the weakness and folly of the Mormons, to think they  could possibly hold out in such a course. [p. 37]
that it was of no use for me to say any thing more; in fact I felt it was necessary for me to look out for my own safety.

Chapter 21

CHAPTER XXI.
 
Public meeting—Resolutions passed—Volunteers raised—Reflections—Expedition to —Doings there—New order of consecration—Enthusiastic notions—Plunderings—Piece of ordnance taken.
 
This conversation was on Sunday morning after they returned from . Smith preached that day pretty much from the same spirit, and requested a general meeting of all the male members on the next day. They accordingly met, and passed resolutions to the following effect. All the members of the church should take hold and help; those who had been backward in carrying on the warfare should now come forward, and their property should be consecrated, so far as might be necessary for the use of the army. If any man undertook to leave the place, and go to the enemy, he should be stopped and brought back, or loose his life. As soon as this meeting was over, they collected upon the public square, and called for volunteers. About two hundred were raised to go to . Others were raised to guard . A company, called the Fur Company, was raised, for the purpose of procuring provisions, for pressing teams, and even men sometimes, into the army in . I now saw plainly that they had become desperate, and their career would soon end; for I knew that their doings would soon bring the people on them, and I dreaded the consequences. I would have been glad to have left the with my family, but I could not get away; the decree was passed, and there was no other chance for me and the other dissenters but to pretend to take hold with the rest. I now understood that they meant to fall upon and scatter the mob wherever they could find them collected.
The next day, which was Tuesday, they marched to . The following day it snowed, and there was not much done, except perhaps to lay some plans of operation. The next day a company of about eighty mounted men went to , where they found from ten to twenty men, who fled as they approached the town. They plundered a store and burnt it, and carried off some other property. Another company of seventy or eighty went to Millport, and on finding the place pretty much deserted they left it as they found it. Another company, of about the same size, went on to Grindstone Fork, and professed themselves to be citizens of Carroll. This they did, I was told, to find out who was against them. They also committed some little thefts. Another company, on foot, went somewhere in the country, and returned with a quantity of plundered property.
During these two days I laid by the fire with a lame leg. I clearly saw, from the remarks passing through the camp, and from their doings, that destruction to the Mormons was nigh at hand. I was astonished at the weakness and folly of the Mormons, to think they could possibly hold out in such a course. [p. 37]
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