John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Chapter 24
CHAPTER XXIV.
 
Reflections—Terms of peace—Surrender of Smith, , and others—Arms sur rendered—Place guarded—Prisoners and arms taken to .
 
This order greatly agitated my mind. I expected we should be ex terminated without fail. There lay three thousand men, highly excited  and full of vengeance, and it was as much as the officers could do to  keep them off from us any how; and they now had authority from the  executive to exterminate, with orders to cut off our retreat, and the  word Mormons, I thought, included innocent as well as guilty; so of  course there was no escape for any. These were my first reflections  on hearing the order. But soon said that they would  be more mild than the order required; that if we would give up the  heads of the church to be punished; surrender our arms; give up all  our property, (those who had taken up arms,) to pay the debts of the  whole church and the damages done in and elsewhere; and  then all leave the forthwith, except those retained to be pun ished, they would spare our lives, and protect us out of the .  The sun was then about two hours high, and he gave us till sunset to  make up our minds and deliver the prisoners. A gentleman of note  told me that if these men were suffered to escape, or if they could not  be found, nothing could save the place from destruction and the people  from extermination. We knew that had no authority,  and his requirements were illegal; for he was out of the bounds of his  division, and the ’s order was to , and not to  him: but there was no other way for the Mormons but to submit.  We immediately went into and collected Joseph Smith, jr., , , , to gether, and told them what the ’s order and  required. Smith said if it was the ’s order, they would sub mit, and the Lord would take care of them. So we hurried with them  as fast as possible to the place appointed. We met ,  with his army, but a short distance from . He had made every  arrangement to surround and destroy the place; but the prisoners de livered themselves up, and , with the army and priso ners, returned to their camp. These prisoners were to be retained  as hostages till morning, and then, if they did not agree to the propo sals, they were to be set at liberty again. I suppose they agreed to  the proposals, for they were not set at liberty. Next morning, marched his army near to town, and marched  out the Mormons, who gave up their arms, about six hundred guns, be sides swords and pistols, and surrendered themselves as prisoners. I  would here remark, that a few days previous to this, news had fre quently came to that they were soon to be attacked, and   destroyed: so the of the county court had or dered with the militia to guard the county against inva sion. They turned out and organized under this order, and in this  situation surrendered to . A guard was placed around   to keep all things secure, and , with an army, [p. 42]
Chapter 24
CHAPTER XXIV.
 
Reflections—Terms of peace—Surrender of Smith, , and others—Arms surrendered—Place guarded—Prisoners and arms taken to .
 
This order greatly agitated my mind. I expected we should be exterminated without fail. There lay three thousand men, highly excited and full of vengeance, and it was as much as the officers could do to keep them off from us any how; and they now had authority from the executive to exterminate, with orders to cut off our retreat, and the word Mormons, I thought, included innocent as well as guilty; so of course there was no escape for any. These were my first reflections on hearing the order. But soon said that they would be more mild than the order required; that if we would give up the heads of the church to be punished; surrender our arms; give up all our property, (those who had taken up arms,) to pay the debts of the whole church and the damages done in and elsewhere; and then all leave the forthwith, except those retained to be punished, they would spare our lives, and protect us out of the . The sun was then about two hours high, and he gave us till sunset to make up our minds and deliver the prisoners. A gentleman of note told me that if these men were suffered to escape, or if they could not be found, nothing could save the place from destruction and the people from extermination. We knew that had no authority, and his requirements were illegal; for he was out of the bounds of his division, and the ’s order was to , and not to him: but there was no other way for the Mormons but to submit. We immediately went into and collected Joseph Smith, jr., , , , together, and told them what the ’s order and required. Smith said if it was the ’s order, they would submit, and the Lord would take care of them. So we hurried with them as fast as possible to the place appointed. We met , with his army, but a short distance from . He had made every arrangement to surround and destroy the place; but the prisoners delivered themselves up, and , with the army and prisoners, returned to their camp. These prisoners were to be retained as hostages till morning, and then, if they did not agree to the proposals, they were to be set at liberty again. I suppose they agreed to the proposals, for they were not set at liberty. Next morning, marched his army near to town, and marched out the Mormons, who gave up their arms, about six hundred guns, besides swords and pistols, and surrendered themselves as prisoners. I would here remark, that a few days previous to this, news had frequently came to that they were soon to be attacked, and destroyed: so the of the county court had ordered with the militia to guard the county against invasion. They turned out and organized under this order, and in this situation surrendered to . A guard was placed around to keep all things secure, and , with an army, [p. 42]
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