John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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Chapter 14
CHAPTER XIV.
 
Smith’s charge to the elders—Their return—Gathering continues—Mormons leave   and settle in —In debt—Pride—Merchandizing—Banking— Dissentions and its effects—Elders go to England.
 
At the close of the solemn assembly meetings in , Smith  told the elders that they were now endowed with power to go forth  and build up the Kingdom, that they must now call upon God for  themselves, and do that which the Spirit directed them to do, and  every man was accountable to God for his own doings, and he charged  them to be careful and avoid contention, and not to meddle with  other orders of Christians, nor proclaim against their doctrines, but to  preach the gospel in its simplicity, and let others alone.
The elders that lived in Upper returned to their homes in  , in the Spring of 1836, but had not been there long be fore a portion of the people who had been peaceable during their ab sence, began now to be uneasy. The church also continued to ga ther in , till the appearance was that they would sooner  or later be overrun by the Mormons, and this uneasy portion of the  people, either because they hated our religion, or were afraid we  would become a majority, or for some other cause, I know not what,  (for the Mormons had committed no crime,) continued to stir up ex citement, and the Mormons began to prepare for self defence, until  the more rational and sensible part of the citizens saw that it was  coming to bloodshed, and that something must be done. They ac cordingly appointed a committee who called upon the Mormons to  meet them in conference, which they did, and agreed to leave the  . The committee agreed to, and did help them to obtain a  place of residence, which was in the territory of , since  organised into the county of , and the people in the vicinity  consented to it. The Mormons purchased great quantities of land in  , made improvements, and their works plainly show that they  were industrious, though they laboured under many disadvantages,  on account of their poverty and former difficulties. Many of them  were obliged to seek labor in the neighboring counties for their bread.  The people gave them employment, and many of them also borrowed  money, to purchase lands with. Friendship began to be restored be tween them and their neighbors, the old prejudices were fast dying  away, and they were doing well, until the summer of 1838.
And now I return to with my story. After finishing the   so far as to have it ready for the solemn assembly,  the church found itself something like fifteen or twenty thousand dol lars in debt, as near as I can recollect. As the had been built  by faith, as they termed it, they must now continue their faith and  contrive some means to pay the debt. Notwithstanding they were  deeply in debt, they had so managed as to keep up their credit, so  they concluded to try mercantile business. Accordingly, they ran in  debt in , and elsewhere, some thirty thousand dollars, for [p. 26]
Chapter 14
CHAPTER XIV.
 
Smith’s charge to the elders—Their return—Gathering continues—Mormons leave and settle in —In debt—Pride—Merchandizing—Banking—Dissentions and its effects—Elders go to England.
 
At the close of the solemn assembly meetings in , Smith told the elders that they were now endowed with power to go forth and build up the Kingdom, that they must now call upon God for themselves, and do that which the Spirit directed them to do, and every man was accountable to God for his own doings, and he charged them to be careful and avoid contention, and not to meddle with other orders of Christians, nor proclaim against their doctrines, but to preach the gospel in its simplicity, and let others alone.
The elders that lived in Upper returned to their homes in , in the Spring of 1836, but had not been there long before a portion of the people who had been peaceable during their absence, began now to be uneasy. The church also continued to gather in , till the appearance was that they would sooner or later be overrun by the Mormons, and this uneasy portion of the people, either because they hated our religion, or were afraid we would become a majority, or for some other cause, I know not what, (for the Mormons had committed no crime,) continued to stir up excitement, and the Mormons began to prepare for self defence, until the more rational and sensible part of the citizens saw that it was coming to bloodshed, and that something must be done. They accordingly appointed a committee who called upon the Mormons to meet them in conference, which they did, and agreed to leave the . The committee agreed to, and did help them to obtain a place of residence, which was in the territory of , since organised into the county of , and the people in the vicinity consented to it. The Mormons purchased great quantities of land in , made improvements, and their works plainly show that they were industrious, though they laboured under many disadvantages, on account of their poverty and former difficulties. Many of them were obliged to seek labor in the neighboring counties for their bread. The people gave them employment, and many of them also borrowed money, to purchase lands with. Friendship began to be restored between them and their neighbors, the old prejudices were fast dying away, and they were doing well, until the summer of 1838.
And now I return to with my story. After finishing the so far as to have it ready for the solemn assembly, the church found itself something like fifteen or twenty thousand dollars in debt, as near as I can recollect. As the had been built by faith, as they termed it, they must now continue their faith and contrive some means to pay the debt. Notwithstanding they were deeply in debt, they had so managed as to keep up their credit, so they concluded to try mercantile business. Accordingly, they ran in debt in , and elsewhere, some thirty thousand dollars, for [p. 26]
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