John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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try to do any thing about it, for they would be unable to get justice.  They took his advice, and returned with the guard.

Chapter 12

CHAP XII.
 
and visit —Strength of the Lord’s house—Proceed to —Their intentions—The Cholera—Dispersion— Description—Elders gather at —Learning sought for—Solemn assembly  and its effects—Dedication—Book of Articles and Covenants adopted—Authorities  organised.
 
About this time, and went to , and after seeing Smith, who resided there, and consulting on the  subject, they received a revelation to gather up the strength of the  Lord’s house, and go up to relieve their brethren, who had been driven  out of Zion. Accordingly, they gathered up about two hundred and  fifty men, who armed themselves, and with Smith at their head, march ed to , where they arrived some time in June, ’34. Mean while the Mormons in made preparations to join them,  when they should get there, and they generally thought that the , on a petition to that effect, would reinstate those that had been  driven out from their lands, (for they had not sold them) and then their  brethren that came up in the would enable them to keep pos session of their lands. But after arriving in a council  was held, in which it was concluded to give up the expedition at that  time.
The cholera broke out among them, and they immediately disper sed, the most of them returning home again, in a short time.
With the exception of some little threatening, the church lived in  peace, until the summer of ’36; and, notwithstanding all these difficul ties, it continued to gather in ; and in the adjacent coun ties, the members hoping that they would get back to .
The church also kept gathering at . They laid out a town,  appointed certain lots for various purposes, one of which was to build  the upon, for the building of which they had received  a revelation. This building they commenced, if I recollect rightly,  [i]n ’33, in poverty, and without means to do it. In 1834 they completed  the work, and in ’35 and 6 they nearly finished it. The cost was  nearly $40,000. A committee was appointed to gather donations.  They travelled among the churches and collected a considerable amount,  but not sufficient, so that in the end they found themselves 13 or  $14,000 in debt. This was 80 feet by 60; and 57 feet high to  the top of the wall. It was divided into two stories, each twenty-two  feet high, and arched over head. Ten feet was cut off from the front end  by a partition and used as an entrance, and it also contained the stairs.  This left the main room 55 by 65 feet in the clear, both below and  above. In each of these rooms were built two pulpits, one in each end. [p. 21]
try to do any thing about it, for they would be unable to get justice. They took his advice, and returned with the guard.

Chapter 12

CHAP XII.
 
and visit —Strength of the Lord’s house—Proceed to —Their intentions—The Cholera—Dispersion——Description—Elders gather at —Learning sought for—Solemn assembly and its effects—Dedication—Book of Articles and Covenants adopted—Authorities organised.
 
About this time, and went to , and after seeing Smith, who resided there, and consulting on the subject, they received a revelation to gather up the strength of the Lord’s house, and go up to relieve their brethren, who had been driven out of Zion. Accordingly, they gathered up about two hundred and fifty men, who armed themselves, and with Smith at their head, marched to , where they arrived some time in June, ’34. Meanwhile the Mormons in made preparations to join them, when they should get there, and they generally thought that the , on a petition to that effect, would reinstate those that had been driven out from their lands, (for they had not sold them) and then their brethren that came up in the would enable them to keep possession of their lands. But after arriving in a council was held, in which it was concluded to give up the expedition at that time.
The cholera broke out among them, and they immediately dispersed, the most of them returning home again, in a short time.
With the exception of some little threatening, the church lived in peace, until the summer of ’36; and, notwithstanding all these difficulties, it continued to gather in ; and in the adjacent counties, the members hoping that they would get back to .
The church also kept gathering at . They laid out a town, appointed certain lots for various purposes, one of which was to build the upon, for the building of which they had received a revelation. This building they commenced, if I recollect rightly, in ’33, in poverty, and without means to do it. In 1834 they completed the work, and in ’35 and 6 they nearly finished it. The cost was nearly $40,000. A committee was appointed to gather donations. They travelled among the churches and collected a considerable amount, but not sufficient, so that in the end they found themselves 13 or $14,000 in debt. This was 80 feet by 60; and 57 feet high to the top of the wall. It was divided into two stories, each twenty-two feet high, and arched over head. Ten feet was cut off from the front end by a partition and used as an entrance, and it also contained the stairs. This left the main room 55 by 65 feet in the clear, both below and above. In each of these rooms were built two pulpits, one in each end. [p. 21]
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