John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page [7]
image
HISTORY
of
THE MORMONS.

Chapter 1

CHAPTER I.
 
Introduction to the work—New Revelation—Golden Bible—Curiosity excited—Book  of Mormon—Campbelites——Conversion of—Feelings excited— Visit to —Situation of the Society—sought argument—’s An swer—Return home—Reflection and Examination—Evil Reports—Second Visit —Extraordinary meeting—Return and Investigation—Subjects of Investigation.
 
Sometime in the fall of 1830, , , and , came through the county of Ashtabula,  Ohio, where I then resided, on their way westward. They professed  to be special messengers of the Living God, sent to preach the Gospel  in its purity, as it was anciently preached by the Apostles. They had  with them a new revelation, which they said had been translated from  certain golden plates that had been deposited in a hill, (anciently called  Camorah,) in the township of , Ontario county, New York.  They were deposited about 1400 years since by one Moroni, under  the direction of Heaven, with a promise that in the Lord’s own due  time, they should be brought forth, for the special benefit of the rem nant of his people, the house of Israel, through Joseph, of Egypt, as  well as for the salvation of the Gentiles upon this continent. This  soon became the topic of conversation in that section of country, and  excited the curiosity of the people,—at first, more to inquiry than  otherwise, as these messengers stopped in the place only one night.  In the course of two or three days, the book of Mormon, (the Golden  Bible, as the people then termed it, on account of its having been trans lated from the Golden plates,) was presented to me for perusal. I  looked at it, examined the testimony of the witnesses at the last end  of it, read promiscuously a few pages, and made up my mind that it was  published for speculation. In my feelings and remarks I branded the  “messengers” with the title of impostors, and thought I would not  trouble myself any more about them. But I shortly heard that these  messengers had stopped in , about thirty miles distant, among  a society of people called Campbleites, at whose head stood elder , a noted preacher of that order. With this news I was  at first much pleased; for, from my former acquaintance with that [p. [7]]
HISTORY
of
THE MORMONS.

Chapter 1

CHAPTER I.
 
Introduction to the work—New Revelation—Golden Bible—Curiosity excited—Book of Mormon—Campbelites——Conversion of—Feelings excited—Visit to —Situation of the Society—sought argument—’s Answer—Return home—Reflection and Examination—Evil Reports—Second Visit—Extraordinary meeting—Return and Investigation—Subjects of Investigation.
 
Sometime in the fall of 1830, , , and , came through the county of Ashtabula, Ohio, where I then resided, on their way westward. They professed to be special messengers of the Living God, sent to preach the Gospel in its purity, as it was anciently preached by the Apostles. They had with them a new revelation, which they said had been translated from certain golden plates that had been deposited in a hill, (anciently called Camorah,) in the township of , Ontario county, New York. They were deposited about 1400 years since by one Moroni, under the direction of Heaven, with a promise that in the Lord’s own due time, they should be brought forth, for the special benefit of the remnant of his people, the house of Israel, through Joseph, of Egypt, as well as for the salvation of the Gentiles upon this continent. This soon became the topic of conversation in that section of country, and excited the curiosity of the people,—at first, more to inquiry than otherwise, as these messengers stopped in the place only one night. In the course of two or three days, the book of Mormon, (the Golden Bible, as the people then termed it, on account of its having been translated from the Golden plates,) was presented to me for perusal. I looked at it, examined the testimony of the witnesses at the last end of it, read promiscuously a few pages, and made up my mind that it was published for speculation. In my feelings and remarks I branded the “messengers” with the title of impostors, and thought I would not trouble myself any more about them. But I shortly heard that these messengers had stopped in , about thirty miles distant, among a society of people called Campbleites, at whose head stood elder , a noted preacher of that order. With this news I was at first much pleased; for, from my former acquaintance with that [p. [7]]
Page [7]