John Corrill, A Brief History of the Church of Christ of Latter Day Saints, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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on and bless them in the name of the Lord. This they say, was  according to the custom of the ancients, also of the Saviour, who com manded little children to be brought to him for that purpose. They  also believe that a child begins to be accountable at eight years old,  and not sooner; and it is the duty of the parents to teach and instruct  them up to that age, and then have them baptised into the church.
It also was a rule in the church to have one in each stake (most gen erally the oldest, if suitable) appointed and ordained a patriarch, whose  duty it was to be a sort of father to the church, and bless such children  as had no natural father to bless them.
For a general rule, they excluded the use of ardent spirits, tobacco,  tea, and coffee, in accordance with a revelation called the words of  wisdom, in which the abstinence from these things were recommend ed, but not commanded. Also, wasting of flesh, or taking of life of ani mals unnecessarily, or for sport, was forbidden.
The sacrament was administered on every first day, (sabbath,) by a  high priest or an elder. Bread and wine are used as emblems, but for  wine they prefer the pure juice of the grape when they can get it, and  they administer in remembrance of the body and blood of the Saviour,  as the scripture commands.
They believe that in the resurrection there are different glories to  which persons will be raised and enjoy. The first is compared to the  sun, and is called the celestial; the second is compared to the moon,  and is called the terrestrial; the third is compared to the stars, and is  called the telestial. The last has in itself many different glories, differ ing from each other as do the stars.—1 Cor. xv. 40–42. They also  believe that every man will be raised in his own order, and will enjoy  that glory for which he has been prepared, according to his works.
The celestial kingdom, they think, is a kingdom of perfect order,  and he that will not submit to the laws and ordinances and established  order of God in the church, can never enter the celestial glory. And  they believe that the spirits of the just enter paradise, after death, and  remain there until the resurrection, when they are reunited with the  body, and enter into a perfect state of glory. They also believe that  the wicked will be raised according to the scriptures.
They believe that matter is eternal, and that nothing of all God’s  works will ever be destroyed or lost; but in the end all things will be  restored to their proper place, and the sons of perdition alone will en dure the lowest hell, or lake of fire and brimstone.
In matters of war, they hold it a duty to strive for peace, and not  resent an injury, but bear patiently the first, second, and third time;  but they are not bound to receive or bear the fourth, but may resist to  the uttermost in their own defence, and in putting down their enemies.
They esteem the law of God, as given through their prophet, to be  vastly superior to any other law; and if they could have the privilege,  they would prefer to be governed by that alone; and this, I believe, is  the grand cause of jealousy and difficulty between them and their  neighbors, who prefer to be governed by other laws.
The abolition question is discarded by them, as being inconsistent [p. 47]
on and bless them in the name of the Lord. This they say, was according to the custom of the ancients, also of the Saviour, who commanded little children to be brought to him for that purpose. They also believe that a child begins to be accountable at eight years old, and not sooner; and it is the duty of the parents to teach and instruct them up to that age, and then have them baptised into the church.
It also was a rule in the church to have one in each stake (most generally the oldest, if suitable) appointed and ordained a patriarch, whose duty it was to be a sort of father to the church, and bless such children as had no natural father to bless them.
For a general rule, they excluded the use of ardent spirits, tobacco, tea, and coffee, in accordance with a revelation called the words of wisdom, in which the abstinence from these things were recommended, but not commanded. Also, wasting of flesh, or taking of life of animals unnecessarily, or for sport, was forbidden.
The sacrament was administered on every first day, (sabbath,) by a high priest or an elder. Bread and wine are used as emblems, but for wine they prefer the pure juice of the grape when they can get it, and they administer in remembrance of the body and blood of the Saviour, as the scripture commands.
They believe that in the resurrection there are different glories to which persons will be raised and enjoy. The first is compared to the sun, and is called the celestial; the second is compared to the moon, and is called the terrestrial; the third is compared to the stars, and is called the telestial. The last has in itself many different glories, differing from each other as do the stars.—1 Cor. xv. 40–42. They also believe that every man will be raised in his own order, and will enjoy that glory for which he has been prepared, according to his works.
The celestial kingdom, they think, is a kingdom of perfect order, and he that will not submit to the laws and ordinances and established order of God in the church, can never enter the celestial glory. And they believe that the spirits of the just enter paradise, after death, and remain there until the resurrection, when they are reunited with the body, and enter into a perfect state of glory. They also believe that the wicked will be raised according to the scriptures.
They believe that matter is eternal, and that nothing of all God’s works will ever be destroyed or lost; but in the end all things will be restored to their proper place, and the sons of perdition alone will endure the lowest hell, or lake of fire and brimstone.
In matters of war, they hold it a duty to strive for peace, and not resent an injury, but bear patiently the first, second, and third time; but they are not bound to receive or bear the fourth, but may resist to the uttermost in their own defence, and in putting down their enemies.
They esteem the law of God, as given through their prophet, to be vastly superior to any other law; and if they could have the privilege, they would prefer to be governed by that alone; and this, I believe, is the grand cause of jealousy and difficulty between them and their neighbors, who prefer to be governed by other laws.
The abolition question is discarded by them, as being inconsistent [p. 47]
Page 47