Lucy Mack Smith, History, 1845

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 259
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tion rights, and the corn in the fields, had all been previously purchased by the Mormons of the people, and paid for in money and with wagons and horses and with other property about two weeks before; butt they had not taken possession of the premises: but this wicked transaction was for the purpose of clandestinely exciting the minds of the prejudiced populace and the , that they might get an order that they could the more easily carry out their hellish purposes, in expulsion or externination, or utter extinction of the Mormon people. After witnessing the distressed situation of the people in , my brother Joseph Smith senior and returned back to the City of , and immediately despatched a messenger with a writen document to , stating the facts as they did then exist, praying for assistance if possible, and requesting the E[d]itor of the “Far West” to insert the same in his newspaper; but he utterly refused to do so,— We still believed that we should get assistance from the and again petitioned him praying for assistance, setting forth our distressed situation; and in the mean time the presiding Judge of the county Court isued orders upon affidavits made to him by the citizens— to the sheriff of the county, to order out the Militia of the county to stand in constant readiness night and day, to prevent the citizens from being massacred which fearful situation they were exposed to every moment, Every thing was very portentious and alarming. Notwithstanding all this, there was yet a ray of hope in the minds of the people that the would render us assistance; and whilst the people were waiting anxiously for deliverance— men women and children frightened, praying and weeping we beheld at a distance crossing the prarie and approaching the a large army in Millitary array, brandishing their glittering swords in the sunshine, and we could not but feel joyful for a moment, thinking that [p. 259]
tion rights, and the corn in the fields, had all been previously purchased by the Mormons of the people, and paid for in money and with wagons and horses and with other property about two weeks before; butt they had not taken possession of the premises: but this wicked transaction was for the purpose of clandestinely exciting the minds of the prejudiced populace and the , that they might get an order that they could the more easily carry out their hellish purposes, in expulsion or externination, or utter extinction of the Mormon people. After witnessing the distressed situation of the people in , my brother Joseph Smith senior and returned back to the City of , and immediately despatched a messenger with a writen document to , stating the facts as they did then exist, praying if possible, and requesting the Editor of the “Far West” to insert the same in his newspaper; but he utterly refused to do so,— We still believed that we should get assistance from the and again petitioned him praying for assistance, setting forth our distressed situation; and in the mean time the presiding Judge of the county Court isued orders upon affidavits made to him by the citizens— to the sheriff of the county, to order out the Militia of the county to stand in constant readiness night and day, to prevent the citizens from being massacred which fearful situation they were exposed to every moment, Every thing was very portentious and alarming. Notwithstanding all this, there was yet a ray of hope in the minds of the people that the would render us assistance; and whilst the people were waiting anxiously for deliverance— men women and children frightened, praying and weeping we beheld at a distance crossing the prarie and approaching the a large army in Millitary array, brandishing their glittering swords in the sunshine, and we could not but feel joyful for a moment, thinking that [p. 259]
Page 259