Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 52
image
suffering every thing but death. The next morning after my dialogue with , he again entered our prison and informed us that he had concluded to deliver us over to the civil authorities for an examining trial. I then asked him why he did not do away the unlawful decree of banishment, which was first ordered by , in compliance with the ’s order, compelling all our people to leave the by the next spring? He replied that he approved of all the proceedings of , and should not alter them. I make this statement, because many writers have commended for his heroic, merciful, and prudent conduct towards our Society, and have endeavored to make it appear that was not to be blamed for any of the measures of .
The court of enquiry now commenced, before Judge . This continued from the 11th to the 28th of November, during which we were kept most of the time in chains, and our brethren, some fifty in number, were penned up in the open, unfinished court house.
It was a very severe spell of snow and winter weather, and we suffered much. During this time was taken very sick, from hardship and exposure, and finally lost his reason; but still he was kept in our miserable, noisy, and cold room, and compelled to sleep on the floor with a chain and padlock round his ankle, and fastened to six others; and here he endured the constant noise and confusion of an unruly guard, who were changed every few hours, and who were frequently composed of the most noisy, foul-mouthed, vulgar, disgraceful, indecent rabble, that ever defiled the earth. While he lay in this situation, his son-in-law, , the only male member of his numerous family, was chained by his side; and thus Mrs. [Phebe Brook] Rigdon and her daughters were left entirely destitute and unprotected. One of his daughters, Mrs. Robison [Athalia Rigdon Robinson], a young and delicate fe [p. 52]
suffering every thing but death. The next morning after my dialogue with , he again entered our prison and informed us that he had concluded to deliver us over to the civil authorities for an examining trial. I then asked him why he did not do away the unlawful decree of banishment, which was first ordered by , in compliance with the ’s order, compelling all our people to leave the by the next spring? He replied that he approved of all the proceedings of , and should not alter them. I make this statement, because many writers have commended for his heroic, merciful, and prudent conduct towards our Society, and have endeavored to make it appear that was not to be blamed for any of the measures of .
The court of enquiry now commenced, before Judge . This continued from the 11th to the 28th of November, during which we were kept most of the time in chains, and our brethren, some fifty in number, were penned up in the open, unfinished court house.
It was a very severe spell of snow and winter weather, and we suffered much. During this time was taken very sick, from hardship and exposure, and finally lost his reason; but still he was kept in our miserable, noisy, and cold room, and compelled to sleep on the floor with a chain and padlock round his ankle, and fastened to six others; and here he endured the constant noise and confusion of an unruly guard, who were changed every few hours, and who were frequently composed of the most noisy, foul-mouthed, vulgar, disgraceful, indecent rabble, that ever defiled the earth. While he lay in this situation, his son-in-law, , the only male member of his numerous family, was chained by his side; and thus Mrs. Phebe Brook Rigdon and her daughters were left entirely destitute and unprotected. One of his daughters, Mrs. Robison [Athalia Rigdon Robinson], a young and delicate fe [p. 52]
Page 52