Parley P. Pratt, History of the Late Persecution, 1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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ry the most critical of any ever presented to the Legislature of this : one in which the rights of a portion of the free citizens of the is concerned on one side, and the rights of another portion of the same citizens on the other. Upon the decision of this subject the character of the is suspended. If upon full investigation it is found (and reported by the committee to the Legislature) that the Mormons are not the aggressors, and that some of them have been murdered, others driven from the by a military force, and others imprisoned by order of the , then our character will be established as the most lawless invaders of religious and civil rights.’
Will the public believe that with the above view of the subject, the Legislature avoided an investigation? Wonder and be astonished, O Americans!
The following toast was given by John A. Gordon, at a public dinner in honor of Major Gen. , given by the citizens of , Missouri, Nov. 12th, 1838, in relation to the proceedings against the Mormons:
‘Gen. ; paid high compliment to his bravery as a soldier, and his humanity as a man in supersceding him in the command of the late expedition against the Mormons; he is not a fit instrument to carry on a war of extermination against defenceless women and children, or to treat uncourteously defenceless and unarmed prisoners.’ -[Taken from the ‘ Columbia Patriot.]-
The following is from a paper, printed in Callaway county, entitled ‘The Banner of Liberty.’
‘The of has negotiated a State loan with the Bank of of three hundred and forty thousand dollars. Of this sum two hundred thousand dollars are to go towards paying the expenses of the troops called out to drive the mormons from the State.
The following is taken from the ‘Boonslick Democrat,’ a paper, under date of January 19, 1839:
‘A letter under date of the 29th November, 1838, has [p. 70]
ry the most critical of any ever presented to the Legislature of this : one in which the rights of a portion of the free citizens of the is concerned on one side, and the rights of another portion of the same citizens on the other. Upon the decision of this subject the character of the is suspended. If upon full investigation it is found (and reported by the committee to the Legislature) that the Mormons are not the aggressors, and that some of them have been murdered, others driven from the by a military force, and others imprisoned by order of the , then our character will be established as the most lawless invaders of religious and civil rights.’
Will the public believe that with the above view of the subject, the Legislature avoided an investigation? Wonder and be astonished, O Americans!
The following toast was given by John A. Gordon, at a public dinner in honor of Major Gen. , given by the citizens of , Missouri, Nov. 12th, 1838, in relation to the proceedings against the Mormons:
‘Gen. ; paid high compliment to his bravery as a soldier, and his humanity as a man in supersceding him in the command of the late expedition against the Mormons; he is not a fit instrument to carry on a war of extermination against defenceless women and children, or to treat uncourteously defenceless and unarmed prisoners.’ -[Taken from the ‘ Columbia Patriot.]-
The following is from a paper, printed in Callaway county, entitled ‘The Banner of Liberty.’
‘The of has negotiated a State loan with the Bank of of three hundred and forty thousand dollars. Of this sum two hundred thousand dollars are to go towards paying the expenses of the troops called out to drive the mormons from the State.
The following is taken from the ‘Boonslick Democrat,’ a paper, under date of January 19, 1839:
‘A letter under date of the 29th November, 1838, has [p. 70]
Page 70