Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 38[a]
image
The following is a short history of my travels to the state of and of a bloody tragedy acted at on Oct. 30th 1838
On the sixth day of July last I started with my family from Ohio for the State of The county of in the upper part of the being the place of my destination
On the the thirteeneth of Oct I crossed the at Louisianna at which place I heard vague reports of the disturbances in the upper country but nothing that could be relied upon I continued my course westward till I crossed at a place called Comptons ferry, at which place I heard for the the first time that if I proceeded any further on my journey I would be in danger of being stopped by a body of armed men. I was not willing however, while treading my native soil, and breathing republican air to abandon my object, which was to locate myself and family in a fine healthy country, where we could enjoy the society of our friends and connections.
Consequently I prosecuted my journey, till I came to Whitneys mills scituated on in the eastern part of . After crossing the creek, and going about three miles, we met a party of the mob, about forty in number, armed with rifles and mounted on horse<​s​> back who informed us that we could go no farther west, threatning us with instant death if we proceeded any further I asked them the reason of this prohibition, to which they replied that we were Mormons, and that every one who adhered to our religious faith would have to leave the in ten days or renounce their religion, Accordindly they drove us back to the mills above mentioned. Here we tarried three days, and on Fryday the twenty sixth we recrossed the creek and following up its banks, we succeeded in eluding the mob, for the [p. 38[a]]
The following is a short history of my travels to the state of and of a bloody tragedy acted at on Oct. 30th 1838
On the sixth day of July last I started with my family from Ohio for the State of The county of in the upper part of the being the place of my destination
On the the thirteeneth of Oct I crossed the at Louisianna at which place I heard vague reports of the disturbances in the upper country but nothing that could be relied upon I continued my course westward till I crossed at a place called Comptons ferry, at which place I heard for the the first time that if I proceeded any further on my journey I would be in danger of being stopped by a body of armed men. I was not willing however, while treading my native soil, and breathing republican air to abandon my object, which was to locate myself and family in a fine healthy country, where we could enjoy the society of our friends and connections.
Consequently I prosecuted my journey, till I came to Whitneys mills scituated on in the eastern part of . After crossing the creek, and going about three miles, we met a party of the mob, about forty in number, armed with rifles and mounted on horses who informed us that we could go no farther west, threatning us with instant death if we proceeded any further I asked them the reason of this prohibition, to which they replied that we were Mormons, and that every one who adhered to our religious faith would have to leave the in ten days or renounce their religion, Accordindly they drove us back to the mills above mentioned. Here we tarried three days, and on Fryday the twenty sixth we recrossed the creek and following up its banks, we succeeded in eluding the mob, for the [p. 38[a]]
Page 38[a]