Sidney Rigdon, JS, et al., Petition Draft (“To the Publick”), circa 1838–1839

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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time being and gained the residence of a friend in Myers settlement. On Sunday 28th of Oct. we arrivd about twelve oclock at noon at ; where we found a number of our friends. collected together who were holding a council; and deliberating on the best course for them to pursue, to defend themselves against the mob who were collecting in the neighborhood under the command of Col. [Thomas] Jennings <​of and Mr Ashby of co​>, a member of the legislature, and threatning them with house burning and killing. The decision of the council was that our friends there should place themselves in an attitude of self defence.
Accordingly about twenty eight of our men armed themselves and were in constant readiness for an attack of any small body of men that should <​might​> come upon them. The same evening, for some cause best known to themselves, they <​mob​> sent one of their number to enter into a treaty with our friends, which was accepted of on the condition of mutual forbearence on both sides and that each party as far as their influence extended should exert themselves to prevent any further hostilities upon either party. At this time however there was another mob collecting on , at William Mann’s who were threatning us. consequently we remained under arms on monday the twenty ninth which passed away without any molestation from any quarter. On tuesday the thirtieth of Oct that bloody tragedy was acted the scenes of which I shall never forget. More than three fourths of the day had passed in tranquillity, as smiling as the preceeding one I think there was no individual of our company that was apprized of the sudden, and awful fate that hung over our heads, like an overwhelming torrent. which was to change the prospects, the feelings <​and circumstances​> of about thirty families.— The banks of on either side teemed with children sporting and playing, while their mothers were engaged in domestick imployments and their fathers employed in guarding the mills and other property [p. [38[b]]]
time being and gained the residence of a friend in Myers settlement. On Sunday 28th of Oct. we arrivd about at noon at ; where we found a number of our friends. collected together who were holding a council; and deliberating on the best course for them to pursue, to defend themselves against the mob who were collecting in the neighborhood under the command of Col. Thomas Jennings of , , and threatning them with house burning and killing. The decision of the council was that our friends there should place themselves in an attitude of self defence.
Accordingly about twenty eight of our men armed themselves and were in constant readiness for an attack of any small body of men that might come upon them. The same evening, for some cause best known to themselves, the mob sent one of their number to enter into a treaty with our friends, which was accepted of on the condition of mutual forbearence on both sides and that each party as far as their influence extended should exert themselves to prevent any further hostilities upon either party. At this time however there was another mob collecting on , at William Mann’s who were threatning us. consequently we remained under arms on monday the twenty ninth which passed away without molestation from any quarter. On tuesday the thirtieth that bloody tragedy was acted the scenes of which I shall never forget. More than three fourths of the day had passed in tranquillity, as smiling as the preceeding one I think there was no individual of our company that was apprized of the sudden, and awful fate that hung over our heads, like an overwhelming torrent. which was to change the prospects, the feelings and circumstances of about thirty families.— The banks of on either side teemed with children sporting and playing, while their mothers were engaged in domestick imployments and their fathers employed in guarding the mills and other property [p. [38[b]]]
Page [38[b]]