Sidney Rigdon, Testimony, 1 July 1843 [Extradition of JS for Treason]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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another gentleman called telling <​giving​> me the same account and asked me if I would not take my horse and ride out with him and see what was done. I agreed to do so and we started: and after going some three or four miles met a company coming into . We turned and came <​went​> back with them. This mob proved to be that headed by the Revd. a methodist preacher, and the battle called the Bogard battle. After this battle there was a short season of quiet, the mobs disappeared, and the militia returned to , though they were not discharged, but remained under orders untill it should be known how the matter would turn. In the space of a few days, it was said that a large body of armed men were entering the south part of . The county court order<​ed​> the military to go and inquire what was their object, in thus comming into the without permission. The military started as commanded, and little or no information was received at about their movements, untill late the next after noon, when a large army was de<​s​>cried making their way towards . being an elevated situation, the army was discovered while a number of miles from the place. Their object was entirely unknown to the citizens as far as I had any knowledge on the subject, and every man I heard speak of their object expressed as great ignorance of their object as myself. They reached a small stream on the east side of the , which was studded with timber on its banks and for perhaps from half <​to​> a mile to a mile on the east <​south​> side of the stream, at <​an​> hour by by sun <​an hour before sun down​>; there the main body of the army <​army​> halted, and soon after a part of them <​a detachment​> under the command of marched toward the in line of battle This army body was preceded, and probably three fourths of a mile in advance of them, by a man carrying a white flag, who approached within a few rods of the eastern boundery of the , who demanded three persons who were in the , to be sent to their camp after which the whole [p. [13]]
another gentleman called giving me the same account and asked me if I would not take my horse and ride out with him and see what was done. I agreed to do so and we started: and after going some three or four miles met a company coming into . We turned and went back with them. This mob proved to be that headed by the Revd. a methodist preacher, and the battle called the Bogard battle. After this battle there was a short season of quiet, the mobs disappeared, and the militia returned to , though they were not discharged, but remained under orders untill it should be known how the matter would turn. In the space of a few days, it was said that a large body of armed men were entering the south part of . The county court ordered the military to go and inquire what was their object, in thus comming into the without permission. The military started as commanded, and little or no information was received at about their movements, untill late the next after noon, when a large army was descried making their way towards . being an elevated situation, the army was discovered while a number of miles from the place. Their object was entirely unknown to the citizens as far as I had any knowledge on the subject, and every man I heard speak of their object expressed as great ignorance as myself. They reached a small stream on the east side of the , which was studded with timber on its banks and for perhaps from half a mile to a mile on the east south side of the stream, an hour before sun down; there the main body of the army halted, and soon after a a detachment under the command of marched toward the in line of battle This body was preceded, probably three fourths of a mile in advance of them, by a man carrying a white flag, who approached within a few rods of the eastern boundery of the , who demanded three persons who were in the , to be sent to their camp after which the whole [p. [13]]
Page [13]