History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 59
image
subject, I refer you to his communication of the same, published in this  paper. I shall, therfore, pass over that till I come to the 15th year of his life.
It is necessary to premise this account by relating the situation  of the public mind relative to religion, at this time: one  a presiding Elder of the Methodist church, visited , and vicinity.   was a talented man possessing a good share of  literary endowments, and apparent humility. there was a  great awakening, or excitement raised on the subject of religion  and much enquiry for the word of life. Large additions  were made to the Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist church es. ’s manner of communication was peculiarly  calculated to awaken the intellect of the hearer, and arouse  the sinner to look about him for safety—much good instru ction was always drawn from his discourses on the scriptu res, and in common with others, our brother’s mind became awa kened.
For a length of time the reformation seemed to move in  a harmonious manner, but, as the excitement ceased, or those  who had expressed anxieties, had professed a belief in the  pardoning influence and condescension of the Saviour a  general strugle was made by the leading characters of the  different sects, for prosolytes. Then strife seemed to take the place  of that apparent union and harmony which had previous ly characterized the moves and exhortations of the old profes sors, and a cry—I am right—you are wrong—was introduced  in their stead.
In this general strife for followers, his one , and two  of his natural brothers, were persuaded to unite with the Presbyteri ans. This gave opportunity for further reflection; and as will  be seen in the sequel, laid a foundation, or was one means  of laying a foundation for the attestation of the truths, or profess ions of truth, contained in that record called the word of God.
After strong solicitations to unite with one of those different  societies, and seeing the apparent proselyting disposition ma nifested with equal warmth from each, his mind was led  to more seriously contemplate the importance of a move of this  kind. To profess godliness without its benign influence  upon the heart, was a thing so foreign from his feelings, that  his spirit was not at rest day nor night. To unite with a  society professing to be built upon the only sure founda [p. 59]
subject, I refer you to his communication of the same, published in this paper. I shall, therfore, pass over that till I come to the 15th year of his life.
It is necessary to premise this account by relating the situation of the public mind relative to religion, at this time: one a presiding Elder of the Methodist church, visited , and vicinity. was a talented man possessing a good share of literary endowments, and apparent humility. there was a great awakening, or excitement raised on the subject of religion and much enquiry for the word of life. Large additions were made to the Methodist, Presbyterian, and Baptist churches. ’s manner of communication was peculiarly calculated to awaken the intellect of the hearer, and arouse the sinner to look about him for safety—much good instruction was always drawn from his discourses on the scriptures, and in common with others, our brother’s mind became awakened.
For a length of time the reformation seemed to move in a harmonious manner, but, as the excitement ceased, or those who had expressed anxieties, had professed a belief in the pardoning influence and condescension of the Saviour a general strugle was made by the leading characters of the different sects, for prosolytes. Then strife seemed to take the place of that apparent union and harmony which had previously characterized the moves and exhortations of the old professors, and a cry—I am right—you are wrong—was introduced in their stead.
In this general strife for followers, his one , and two of his natural brothers, were persuaded to unite with the Presbyterians. This gave opportunity for further reflection; and as will be seen in the sequel, laid a foundation, or was one means of laying a foundation for the attestation of the truths, or professions of truth, contained in that record called the word of God.
After strong solicitations to unite with one of those different societies, and seeing the apparent proselyting disposition manifested with equal warmth from each, his mind was led to more seriously contemplate the importance of a move of this kind. To profess godliness without its benign influence upon the heart, was a thing so foreign from his feelings, that his spirit was not at rest day nor night. To unite with a society professing to be built upon the only sure founda [p. 59]
Page 59