“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 97
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Installment 6, May 1840

Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, May 1840, 1:97–99. This sixth installment quotes almost verbatim from [], An Appeal to the American People: Being an Account of the Persecutions of the Church of Latter Day Saints; and of the Barbarities Inflicted on Them by the Inhabitants of the State of Missouri (1840), pages 40–45. Rigdon wrote this account during the summer of 1839 and published it with church support early in 1840. Although many of the events reported here can be corroborated from other sources, Rigdon’s chronology is often inaccurate.

A HISTORY, OF THE PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LATTER DAY SAINTS IN .
 
continued.
 
The first day the saints left , they traveled 12 miles, and encamped in a grove of timber, near the road.— That evening, a woman, who had, some short time before given birth to a child, in consequence of the exposure occasioned by the operations of the mob, and having to move her, before her strength would admit, died, and was buried in the grove, without a coffin. There were a considerable number sick, both grown persons and children, which was principally owing to their exposure, and to their having been obliged to live in their wagons and tents so long; and in being deprived of suitable food. No sooner had they started than , called the mob together, and made a speech to them, saying, that they must hasten to assist their friends in . The land sales (he said) were coming on; and if they could get the Mormons driven out, they could get all the lands entitled to pre-emptions; and that they must hasten to , in order to accomplish their object—that, if they would join, and drive them out, they could get all the lands back again, as well as all the pay they received for them. He assured the mob, that they had nothing to fear from the authorities in so doing; for they had now, full proof, that the authorities would not assist the Mormons, and that they might as well take their property from them as not. His request was complied with, and accordingly the whole banditti started; taking with them, their cannon, for . In the mean time, , was busily engaged in raising a mob, in Platt[e], and Clinton counties; to aid in his effort, to drive peaceable citizens. from their homes, and take their property. After the mob had left Corrill [Carroll] county, there was ordered out, a part of two brigades of militia, to check their movements. Generals and , were in command of them, as it was part of their brigades that were ordered out. The first knowledge that the people of or , had of the mob, coming against them, was the arrival of a body of troops under the command of Col. [William] Dunn, of , in . As the people of , had no knowledge of any troops, designed to come into the place, their appearance caused some excitement. Both the miltiary and civil officers, immediately met them, and enquired into the cause of their sudden appearance in the place without giving previous notice. Their commander gave for answer, that “they had been ordered out, by ; to repair to , to operate against a mob, which was on its march from Corrill county, to .” This was on the first day of the week. We have not the precise date, but it was in October. The evening following which was Monday, arrived in . In consequence of these hostile movements on the part of the mob, the people of had assembled together, to take such measures as the emergency of the case might require.
After the arrival of , the authorities made enquiry of him, concerning the matter, and the operations of the mob. He stated that the mob had gone from Corrill county, with their cannon, for the express purpose of driving the saints from ; and that he was going to operate against them; but he said that his troops were so mutinous, that there was but little reliance to be placed in them. He advised the authorities of to send out two or three hundred men to , to defend the people against the violence intended by the mob; until such time, as effectual measures could be taken by the authorities, to put a stop to their operatoins: And he also told them, that , was collecting a mob, in Platt, and other places, for the purpose of attacking [p. 97]
Installment 6, May 1840

Editorial Note
Times and Seasons, May 1840, 1:97–99. This sixth installment quotes almost verbatim from [], An Appeal to the American People: Being an Account of the Persecutions of the Church of Latter Day Saints; and of the Barbarities Inflicted on Them by the Inhabitants of the State of Missouri (1840), pages 40–45. Rigdon wrote this account during the summer of 1839 and published it with church support early in 1840. Although many of the events reported here can be corroborated from other sources, Rigdon’s chronology is often inaccurate.

A HISTORY, OF THE PERSECUTION, OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST, OF LATTER DAY SAINTS IN .
 
continued.
 
The first day the saints left , they traveled 12 miles, and encamped in a grove of timber, near the road.— That evening, a woman, who had, some short time before given birth to a child, in consequence of the exposure occasioned by the operations of the mob, and having to move her, before her strength would admit, died, and was buried in the grove, without a coffin. There were a considerable number sick, both grown persons and children, which was principally owing to their exposure, and to their having been obliged to live in their wagons and tents so long; and in being deprived of suitable food. No sooner had they started than , called the mob together, and made a speech to them, saying, that they must hasten to assist their friends in . The land sales (he said) were coming on; and if they could get the Mormons driven out, they could get all the lands entitled to pre-emptions; and that they must hasten to , in order to accomplish their object—that, if they would join, and drive them out, they could get all the lands back again, as well as all the pay they received for them. He assured the mob, that they had nothing to fear from the authorities in so doing; for they had now, full proof, that the authorities would not assist the Mormons, and that they might as well take their property from them as not. His request was complied with, and accordingly the whole banditti started; taking with them, their cannon, for . In the mean time, , was busily engaged in raising a mob, in Platte, and Clinton counties; to aid in his effort, to drive peaceable citizens. from their homes, and take their property. After the mob had left Corrill [Carroll] county, there was ordered out, a part of two brigades of militia, to check their movements. Generals and , were in command of them, as it was part of their brigades that were ordered out. The first knowledge that the people of or , had of the mob, coming against them, was the arrival of a body of troops under the command of Col. William Dunn, of , in . As the people of , had no knowledge of any troops, designed to come into the place, their appearance caused some excitement. Both the miltiary and civil officers, immediately met them, and enquired into the cause of their sudden appearance in the place without giving previous notice. Their commander gave for answer, that “they had been ordered out, by ; to repair to , to operate against a mob, which was on its march from Corrill county, to .” This was on the first day of the week. We have not the precise date, but it was in October. The evening following which was Monday, arrived in . In consequence of these hostile movements on the part of the mob, the people of had assembled together, to take such measures as the emergency of the case might require.
After the arrival of , the authorities made enquiry of him, concerning the matter, and the operations of the mob. He stated that the mob had gone from Corrill county, with their cannon, for the express purpose of driving the saints from ; and that he was going to operate against them; but he said that his troops were so mutinous, that there was but little reliance to be placed in them. He advised the authorities of to send out two or three hundred men to , to defend the people against the violence intended by the mob; until such time, as effectual measures could be taken by the authorities, to put a stop to their operatoins: And he also told them, that , was collecting a mob, in Platt, and other places, for the purpose of attacking [p. 97]
Page 97