History, 1834–1836

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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worthy the consideration and observance of every individual, and every society:— They are that he never works in the dark—his works are always performed in a clear, intelligible manner: and another point is, that he never works in vain. This is not the case with men; but might it not be? When the Lord works, he accomplishes his purposes, and the effects of his power are to be seen afterward. In view of this, suffer me to make a few remarks by way of introduction, The works of man may shine for a season with a degree of brilliancy, but time changes their comp[l]exion; and whether it did or not, all would be the same in a little space, as nothing except that which was erected by the hand which never grows weak, can remain when corruption is consumed.
I shall not be required to adorn and beautify my narrative with a relation of the faith of Enoch, and those who assisted him to build up Zion, which fled to God—on the mountains of which was commanded the blessing, life forever more—to be held in reserve to add another ray of glory to the grand retinue, when worlds shall rock from their base to their center; the nations of the righteous rise from the dust, and the blessed millions of the church of the first born shout his tri[u]mphant coming, to receive his kingdom, over which he is to reign till all enemies are subdued. Nor shall I write the history of the Lords church raised up according to his own instruction to Moses and Aaron; of the perplexities and discouragements which came upon Israel for their transgressions, their organization upon the land of Canaan, and their overthrow and dispersion among all nations, to reap the reward of their eniquities, to the appearing of the Great Shepherd, in the flesh.
But there is, of necessity a uniformity so exact; a manner so precise, and ordinances so minute, in all ages and generations whenever God has established his church among men, that should I have occasion to recur to either age, and particularly to that characterized by the advent of the Messiah, and the ministry of the apostles of that church; with a cursory view of the same till it lost its visibility on earth; was driven into darkness, or till God took the holy priesthood unto himself wher it has been held in reserve to the present century, as a matter of right [p. 51]
worthy the consideration and observance of every individual, and every society:— They are that he never works in the dark—his works are always performed in a clear, intelligible manner: and another point is, that he never works in vain. This is not the case with men; but might it not be? When the Lord works, he accomplishes his purposes, and the effects of his power are to be seen afterward. In view of this, suffer me to make a few remarks by way of introduction, The works of man may shine for a season with a degree of brilliancy, but time changes their complexion; and whether it did or not, all would be the same in a little space, as nothing except that which was erected by the hand which never grows weak, can remain when corruption is consumed.
I shall not be required to adorn and beautify my narrative with a relation of the faith of Enoch, and those who assisted him to build up Zion, which fled to God—on the mountains of which was commanded the blessing, life forever more—to be held in reserve to add another ray of glory to the grand retinue, when worlds shall rock from their base to their center; the nations of the righteous rise from the dust, and the blessed millions of the church of the first born shout his triumphant coming, to receive his kingdom, over which he is to reign till all enemies are subdued. Nor shall I write the history of the Lords church raised up according to his own instruction to Moses and Aaron; of the perplexities and discouragements which came upon Israel for their transgressions, their organization upon the land of Canaan, and their overthrow and dispersion among all nations, to reap the reward of their eniquities, to the appearing of the Great Shepherd, in the flesh.
But there is, of necessity a uniformity so exact; a manner so precise, and ordinances so minute, in all ages and generations whenever God has established his church among men, that should I have occasion to recur to either age, and particularly to that characterized by the advent of the Messiah, and the ministry of the apostles of that church; with a cursory view of the same till it lost its visibility on earth; was driven into darkness, or till God took the holy priesthood unto himself wher it has been held in reserve to the present century, as a matter of right [p. 51]
Page 51