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Letter from Mason Brayman, 29 July 1843

  • Source Note
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justice of , in the sense, contemplated by the Constitution and laws of the , under which he acts, that he will not, in my opinion, find the least difficulty in refusing to issue another warrant, should an hundred be demanded. It was for the want of the very evidence which those affidavits contain, that he was compelled to issue the last warrant.
I have some opportunity of knowing the feelings of , towards you, and of ascertaining his views upon the subject of these proceedings against you, as well as upon the legal question involved in the charge that you are a fugitive, whom he is bound to surrender. First, he has no prejudice, but regards yourself and the industrious and sober population, which you are gathering around you with sentiments of the same kind regard, that he feels towards all citizens of the , who are moral, just, and obedient to the laws.
As to the other points, I can assure you, with perfect confidence, that, with the evidence now before him, he will issue no more writs— that he will be perfectly satisfied that the demand of is not only unjust, (as he before believed it to be,) but so palpably illegal, and contrary to the meaning of the constitution, as to release him forever from all obligation to give you up, but and enable him to justify himself before the world in refusing to do so. [p. 4]
justice of , in the sense, contemplated by the Constitution and laws of the , under which he acts, that he will not, in my opinion, find the least difficulty in refusing to issue another warrant, should an hundred be demanded. It was for the want of the very evidence which those affidavits contain, that he was compelled to issue the last warrant.
I have some opportunity of knowing the feelings of , towards you, and of ascertaining his views upon the subject of these proceedings against you, as well as upon the legal question involved in the charge that you are a fugitive, whom he is bound to surrender. First, he has no prejudice, but regards yourself and the industrious and sober population, which you are gathering around you with sentiments of the same kind regard, that he feels towards all citizens of the , who are moral, just, and obedient to the laws.
As to the other points, I can assure you, with perfect confidence, that, with the evidence now before him, he will issue no more writs— that he will be perfectly satisfied that the demand of is not only unjust, (as he before believed it to be,) but so palpably illegal, and contrary to the meaning of the constitution, as to release him forever from all obligation to give you up, and enable him to justify himself before the world in refusing to do so. [p. 4]
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