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Letter from Mason Brayman, 29 July 1843

  • Source Note
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The idea that ever intended to call out the Militia is so perfectly absurd, that no one, but a half crazy politician, whose only hope of success depended on his efforts to inflame your people against the , would have resorted to it. An examination of the law of this will show that in cases like yours, even had you been rescued by a mob, he had no authority to do it, and it it is quite certain that he had no such desire. If the should be threatened with invasion, either for the purpose of plunder or of carrying off one of its citizens, the militia would then probably be called out in double quick time.
I believe it has been said that delays acting on this matter, for the purpose of “holding a rod over you,” to influence the votes of your people in the coming election.
To this I say that throughout this whole matter, he has nobly disregarded political considerations. When he issued the writ, he was aware that he received last year nearly the entire vote of your people, and had no reason to fear that they were disposed to take a different course now. Is it to be supposed that he would commence a persecution against by way of experiment, to compel your people to do that which, they would, in [p. 5]
The idea that ever intended to call out the Militia is so perfectly absurd, that no one, but a half crazy politician, whose only hope of success depended on his efforts to inflame your people against the , would have resorted to it. An examination of the law of this will show that in cases like yours, even had you been rescued by a mob, he had no authority to do it, and it it is quite certain that he had no such desire. If the should be threatened with invasion, either for the purpose of plunder or of carrying off one of its citizens, the militia would then probably be called out in double quick time.
I believe it has been said that delays acting on this matter, for the purpose of “holding a rod over you,” to influence the votes of your people in the coming election.
To this I say that throughout this whole matter, he has nobly disregarded political considerations. When he issued the writ, he was aware that he received last year nearly the entire vote of your people, and had no reason to fear that they were disposed to take a different course now. Is it to be supposed that he would commence a persecution by way of experiment, to compel your people to do that which, they would, in [p. 5]
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