Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, circa 30 October 1839–27 January 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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of $25,000. While these purchases were making <​some of​> the sellers were heard to say, “that as soon as they had sold out to the Mormons, and received their pay, they would drive them off, and keep both lands and money”. The mob, when disbanded by the Generals in as aforesaid, instead of repairing to their homes, as commanded, proceeded in a body to the adjoining County of Carroll and encamped around <​the Mormon Village,​> . They sent to the County of and procured a <​piece of​> cannon and invested the village so closely, that no person could leave the town in safety. When they did so, they were fired upon by the mob. The Horses of the Mormons were taken, their Cattle and Hogs either killed or taken and driven away, and the citizens of the village amounting to about seventy families reduced to the greatest extremity by sickness and a want of <​the​> necessary supplies <​of food​> to support exhausted nature.
Thus situated, they applied to for protection and relief: but neither protection nor relief came. Being thus abandoned to their fate by the Executive authority, no alternative was left them, but to seek protection by flight, and the abandonment of their houses and homes to the ravages of the mob. Accordingly on the evening of the 11th of October 1838 they <​invested families​> fled from , and made their way to the counties of & , leaving many of their effects behind <​them,​> in the possession of their besiegers.
Your memorialists will not undertake to draw a picture of the horrors and sufferings of that flight, when shared alike by women and children as well as men. Let a case or two suffice. One Lady, who had given birth [p. 15]
of $25,000. While these purchases were making some of the sellers were heard to say, “that as soon as they had sold out to the Mormons, and received their pay, they would drive them off, and keep both lands and money”. The mob, when disbanded by the Generals in as aforesaid, instead of repairing to their homes, as commanded, proceeded in a body to the adjoining County of Carroll and encamped around the Mormon Village, . They sent to the County of and procured a piece of cannon and invested the village so closely, that no person could leave the town in safety. When they did so, they were fired upon by the mob. The Horses of the Mormons were taken, their Cattle and Hogs either killed or taken and driven away, and the citizens of the village amounting to about seventy families reduced to the greatest extremity by sickness and a want of the necessary supplies of food to support exhausted nature.
Thus situated, they applied to for protection and relief: but neither protection nor relief came. Being thus abandoned to their fate by the Executive authority, no alternative was left them, but to seek protection by flight, and the abandonment of their houses and homes to the ravages of the mob. Accordingly on the evening of the 11th of October 1838 the invested families fled from , and made their way to the counties of & , leaving many of their effects behind them, in the possession of their besiegers.
Your memorialists will not undertake to draw a picture of the horrors and sufferings of that flight, when shared alike by women and children as well as men. Let a case or two suffice. One Lady, who had given birth [p. 15]
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