Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, circa 30 October 1839–27 January 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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in . The Mormons took refuge in an old log house which had been used as a blacksmith shop. On seeing the Militia approach, they cried for quarter; but in vain! They were instantly fired upon, when eighteen of their number fell dead upon the spot. Their murderers then advanced & putting the muzzles of their guns between the logs, fired indiscriminately upon men and children—the living, dying, & <​the​> dead. One little boy, whose father () had just been killed, cried piteously to the Militia to spare his life. The reply was “Kill kill <​him​>,” “Kill him,” (with an oath) “he is the son of a damned Mormon.” He was accordingly shot in the head and fell dead by the side of his father. Just before this little boy was shot, an old man by the name of , a soldier of the revolution, hearing his cries for mercy, came up and begged them to spare his life. <​But instead of listening to his entreaties​> But they hewed him to pieces with an old scythe. They then loaded themselves with plunder and departed <​from this appaling scenes of blood and carnage.​>
Your memorialists have thus, in dis-charge of the duty confided to them by their Brethren, given a brief outline of the history of their wrongs and persecutions in . All which they can prove, and aver to be true.
The Mormons have not provoked these outrages. They have not <​either​> as a body, or as individuals, knowingly violated the laws of , or of the . Their only offence consists in a difference in religious sentiment; and that they have sometimes; but rarely, resorted to the law<​s​> of self defence. The above statement will show, that the Mormons have on all occasions submitted to the laws of the land, and yielded obedience to its authority in every instance; and often at the hazard of both life and property. Whenever they have opposed resistance to the mob, it was only in self defence; and not even then without the authority and sanction of the officers of the law. And what are the wrongs of which they complain? The [p. 25]
in . The Mormons took refuge in an old log house which had been used as a blacksmith shop. On seeing the Militia approach, they cried for quarter; but in vain! They were instantly fired upon, when eighteen of their number fell dead upon the spot. Their murderers then advanced & putting the muzzles of their guns between the logs, fired indiscriminately upon men and children—the living, dying, & the dead. One little boy, whose father () had just been killed, cried piteously to the Militia to spare his life. The reply was “Kill him,” “Kill him,” (with an oath) “he is the son of a damned Mormon.” He was accordingly shot in the head and fell dead by the side of his father. Just before this little boy was shot, an old man by the name of , a soldier of the revolution, hearing his cries for mercy, came up and begged them to spare his life. But instead of listening to his entreaties they hewed him to pieces with an old scythe. They then loaded themselves with plunder and departed from this appaling scene of blood and carnage.
Your memorialists have thus, in dis-charge of the duty confided to them by their Brethren, given a brief outline of the history of their wrongs and persecutions in . All which they can prove, and aver to be true.
The Mormons have not provoked these outrages. They have not either as a body, or as individuals, knowingly violated the laws of , or of the . Their only offence consists in a difference in religious sentiment; and that they have sometimes; but rarely, resorted to the laws of self defence. The above statement will show, that the Mormons have on all occasions submitted to the laws of the land, and yielded obedience to its authority in every instance; and often at the hazard of both life and property. Whenever they have opposed resistance to the mob, it was only in self defence; and not even then without the authority and sanction of the officers of the law. And what are the wrongs of which they complain? The [p. 25]
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