History Draft [21 June–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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such measures as he might consider necessary. He read his orders from the , and wanted to know if our men would obey his orders, when the brethren responded “yes”. whereupon notification was sent to the Police to meet at 6 p.m. in the . He <​further​> reported that had given him information at where he would find three presses in for making bogus money, and said that he wanted to get hold of them.
6 p. m. The police assembled in the and entered into a temporary organization to act under Singleton. many of the regular police were officers of the , and on active service, whose places were filled for the time.
At midnight Captn. Singleton having sent a notification to the ’s Quarters that he wanted the Nauvoo Legion to be in readiness for parade in an hour’s notice, notifications were sent to the Colonels of the several Regiments accordingly.
27 June 1844 • Thursday
Thursd. 27. About 9 a. m. arrived in with subpoenas for witnesses for the expected trial on Saturday the 29th.
At 10 a.m. orders were received from Captn. Singleton to call out that portion of the resident within the limits of the for review at noon.—— immediately issued <​said​> orders to the commandants
At noon about two thirds of the Legion turned out to parade, nearly all of whom were well armed, although all the arms had been taken away, which caused Captn. Singleton and his company to express their astonishment. The Captain made a remark to the effect that it would not do to come against such a force as this. The Legion was soon dismissed on account of a messenger from the , who said that all the troops were dismissed except a small escort which was with him.
5 p.m. with about fifty men arrived at the and gave notice that he would shortly address the citizens. In about half an hour he ascended the frame of a building opposite the and addressed the people.
We here insert the location of the on this memorable day. [p. 2]
such measures as he might consider necessary. He read his orders from the , and wanted to know if our men would obey his orders, when the brethren responded “yes”. whereupon notification was sent to the Police to meet at 6 p.m. in the . He further reported that had given him information at where he would find three presses in for making bogus money, and said that he wanted to get hold of them.
6 p. m. The police assembled in the and entered into a temporary organization to act under Singleton. many of the regular police were officers of the , and on active service, whose places were filled for the time.
At midnight Captn. Singleton having sent a notification to the ’s Quarters that he wanted the Nauvoo Legion to be in readiness for parade in an hour’s notice, notifications were sent to the Colonels of the several Regiments accordingly.
27 June 1844 • Thursday
Thursd. 27. About 9 a. m. arrived in with subpoenas for witnesses for the expected trial on Saturday the 29th.
At 10 a.m. orders were received from Captn. Singleton to call out that portion of the resident within the limits of the for review at noon.—— immediately issued said orders to the commandants
At noon about two thirds of the Legion turned out to parade, nearly all of whom were well armed, although all the arms had been taken away, which caused Captn. Singleton and his company to express their astonishment. The Captain made a remark to the effect that it would not do to come against such a force as this. The Legion was soon dismissed on account of a messenger from the , who said that all the troops were dismissed except a small escort which was with him.
5 p.m. with about fifty men arrived at the and gave notice that he would shortly address the citizens. In about half an hour he ascended the frame of a building opposite the and addressed the people.
We here insert the location of the on this memorable day. [p. 2]
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