Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, circa 30 October 1839–27 January 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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In this mock court of inquiry the prisoners were deprived of all testimony, by an armed force stationed at the Court House; they being advised by their Attorneys, not to attempt to bring any persons as witnesses in their behalf, as they would certainly be in danger of either losing their lives or of being immediately driven from the . The proceeding was of course exparte, and no testimony <​witnesses​> examined, except that <​those​> against them; and that of a most <​prisoners; consisting of individuals much​> prejudiced character <​against the Mormons.​>. In this inquiry <​During this investigation​> a great many questions were asked relative to our religious opinions. The conclusion of the examining court, was, to commit the prisoners once more to jail on a charge of treason against the .
They do not deem it necessary to detail their sufferings while in prison. The horrors of a gloomy dungeon for four long months, shut up in darkness; exposed to the want of every comfort; and for much of the time to the damp and chilling cold of winter, can better be imagined than described. In the following April the prisoners were brought out from their prison and sent <​ordered​> to the County of for trial. They were there formally indicted for Treason, and a change of venue awarded to . The prisoners were accordingly sent <​under an armed escort,​> to the County of ; and while on their way suffered to escape; when they fled for safety to the state of . That they were purposely suffered to escape, cannot be questioned. The truth is, that many of their persecutors, of whom the was most conspicuous at this time, had become ashamed of their conduct against the Mormons, <​and​> resorted to this subterfuge, as the best means of getting out of the scrape, and consequently <​by​> gave <​giving​> the prisoners this opportunity to escape. In proof of this assertion<​,​> the prisoners have ever since been living publicly in the state of , on the border of ; and the Executive of has as yet made no demand upon the Executive of for their surrender, as is his duty, if they are considered fugitives from justice. Can it be supposed that the people of would thus [p. 23]
In this mock court of inquiry the prisoners were deprived of all testimony, by an armed force stationed at the Court House; they being advised by their Attorneys, not to attempt to bring any persons as witnesses in their behalf, as they would certainly be in danger of either losing their lives or of being immediately driven from the . The proceeding was of course exparte, and no witnesses examined, except those against the prisoners; consisting of individuals much prejudiced against the Mormons.. During this investigation a great many questions were asked relative to our religious opinions. The conclusion of the examining court, was, to commit the prisoners once more to jail on a charge of treason against the .
They do not deem it necessary to detail their sufferings while in prison. The horrors of a gloomy dungeon for four long months, shut up in darkness; exposed to the want of every comfort; and for much of the time to the damp and chilling cold of winter, can better be imagined than described. In the following April the prisoners were brought out from their prison and ordered to the County of for trial. They were there formally indicted for Treason, and a change of venue awarded to . The prisoners were accordingly sent under an armed escort, to the County of ; and while on their way suffered to escape; when they fled for safety to the state of . That they were purposely suffered to escape, cannot be questioned. The truth is, that many of their persecutors, of whom the was most conspicuous at this time, had become ashamed of their conduct against the Mormons, and resorted to this subterfuge, as the best means of getting out of the scrape, by giving the prisoners this opportunity to escape. In proof of this assertion, the prisoners have ever since been living publicly in the state of , on the border of ; and the Executive of has as yet made no demand upon the Executive of for their surrender, as is his duty, if they are considered fugitives from justice. Can it be supposed that the people of would thus [p. 23]
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