Times and Seasons, 1 June 1842

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Page 808
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of this , he shall, on conviction thereof before the Mayor, or Municipal Court, be considered a disturber of the public peace, and fined in any sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, or imprisoned not exceeding six months, or both, at the discretion of said Mayor, or Court.
Sec. 2. It is hereby made the duty of all municipal officers to notice, and report to the Mayor, any breach or violation of this or any other ordinance of this that may come within the knowledge, or of which they may be advised; and any officer aforesaid is hereby fully authorized to arrest all such violators of rule, law, and order, either with, or without, process.
Sec. 3. This ordinance to take effect and be in force, from and after its passage. Passed. March. 1st. A. D. 1841.
, Mayor.
, Recorder.
So much for the veracity of this honorable gentleman, this would be Governor.
In regard to the correspondence between Dr. V. Dyer and , referred to by , his statements are foul perversions of truth; the correspondence does not shew either myself or to be abolitionists, but the friends of equal rights and prlvileges to all men.
If the had let us alone we might have let him enjoy his notions, but as he has spoken some falsehoods about us, we shall tell a little truth about him; and thus fulfil the scripture in doing “good for evil.” As we happened to have the following letter in our possession, we thought that we would publish it for his edification, and thus reminded him of the old adage “those that dwell in glass houses, ought to be careful how they throw stones,”
——
LETTER TO MRS. .
Edwardsville, Madison Co.,
Feb. 14, 1842
Ever dear friend: I seat myself at this time to address a few lines to you, as it is a long time since I have seen you, or one of the saints; I always loved your company, and I have often thought of you when your affectionate husband was in jail. I wish you to inform me how much he suffered? and how you fared when he was absent, and whether any one administered to your wants or not? Do not be offended at me for intruding on your patience, for I feel as though you were my sister, and I have been in this four years without friends and brethren until last October.
Now sister , I would tell you some of my trials and difficulties but what are mine to yours? nothing, no nothing! but great will be your reward and eternal your glory.” “If light afflictions work out a great and eternal weight of glory?” what will great ones do! I know our mild temper and calm and peaceable disposition: I well recollect your bright eyes, and pleasant countenance. I remember the first visit I ever had with you, but I fear it will be long before I shall have the pleasure of beholding your face again, and of listening to the instructions of your dear husband, the prophet, and of hearing the gracious words of truth and intelligence that flow from his lips; we have nothing to come or gather with the saints with. . . .
They say that is up for Governor; if he is elected, I say that mobs and destruction await the saints if in his power to accomplish it, unless he is a better man that when I worked for him: I washed and ironed for his family, to the amount of six dollars and seventy-five cents, and because we lived in a wretched old house not one cent would he pay me; he gave me the most abusive language that I ever heard a man utter, without the least provocation, I cannot tell you one tenth-part; but I will tell you a little of the commencement; “did you see Joe when he dug out his gold bible out of the old hollow stump? I should like to have seen him peeping in, pity the devil had not kicked him so far in, that he could not get out again: but they have got him fast up in , and I am glad of it for he has deluded and robbed plenty of innocent men, and that’s what makes you so poor: I suppose you have given him up all you had. Did he ever give you any thing,” he said with a look of contempt. I could bear no longer, I said yes, he gave us a barrel of beef, barrel and all; this so astonished him that he stopped, and I proceeded, but cannot write half of what I said to him in this letter; suffice it to say that I was not at a loss for words; and although they called him governor, governor, he did not appear to me bigger than a skunk, nor of any more importance.
The feelings of my heart I cannot describe when I hear such language about a man that I have never heard teach anything but truth and righteousness, for [p. 808]
of this , he shall, on conviction thereof before the Mayor, or Municipal Court, be considered a disturber of the public peace, and fined in any sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, or imprisoned not exceeding six months, or both, at the discretion of said Mayor, or Court.
Sec. 2. It is hereby made the duty of all municipal officers to notice, and report to the Mayor, any breach or violation of this or any other ordinance of this that may come within the knowledge, or of which they may be advised; and any officer aforesaid is hereby fully authorized to arrest all such violators of rule, law, and order, either with, or without, process.
Sec. 3. This ordinance to take effect and be in force, from and after its passage. Passed. March. 1st. A. D. 1841.
, Mayor.
, Recorder.
So much for the veracity of this honorable gentleman, this would be Governor.
In regard to the correspondence between Dr. V. Dyer and , referred to by , his statements are foul perversions of truth; the correspondence does not shew either myself or to be abolitionists, but the friends of equal rights and prlvileges to all men.
If the had let us alone we might have let him enjoy his notions, but as he has spoken some falsehoods about us, we shall tell a little truth about him; and thus fulfil the scripture in doing “good for evil.” As we happened to have the following letter in our possession, we thought that we would publish it for his edification, and thus reminded him of the old adage “those that dwell in glass houses, ought to be careful how they throw stones,”
——
LETTER TO MRS. .
Edwardsville, Madison Co.,
Feb. 14, 1842
Ever dear friend: I seat myself at this time to address a few lines to you, as it is a long time since I have seen you, or one of the saints; I always loved your company, and I have often thought of you when your affectionate husband was in jail. I wish you to inform me how much he suffered? and how you fared when he was absent, and whether any one administered to your wants or not? Do not be offended at me for intruding on your patience, for I feel as though you were my sister, and I have been in this four years without friends and brethren until last October.
Now sister , I would tell you some of my trials and difficulties but what are mine to yours? nothing, no nothing! but great will be your reward and eternal your glory.” “If light afflictions work out a great and eternal weight of glory?” what will great ones do! I know our mild temper and calm and peaceable disposition: I well recollect your bright eyes, and pleasant countenance. I remember the first visit I ever had with you, but I fear it will be long before I shall have the pleasure of beholding your face again, and of listening to the instructions of your dear husband, the prophet, and of hearing the gracious words of truth and intelligence that flow from his lips; we have nothing to come or gather with the saints with. . . .
They say that is up for Governor; if he is elected, I say that mobs and destruction await the saints if in his power to accomplish it, unless he is a better man that when I worked for him: I washed and ironed for his family, to the amount of six dollars and seventy-five cents, and because we lived in a wretched old house not one cent would he pay me; he gave me the most abusive language that I ever heard a man utter, without the least provocation, I cannot tell you one tenth-part; but I will tell you a little of the commencement; “did you see Joe when he dug out his gold bible out of the old hollow stump? I should like to have seen him peeping in, pity the devil had not kicked him so far in, that he could not get out again: but they have got him fast up in , and I am glad of it for he has deluded and robbed plenty of innocent men, and that’s what makes you so poor: I suppose you have given him up all you had. Did he ever give you any thing,” he said with a look of contempt. I could bear no longer, I said yes, he gave us a barrel of beef, barrel and all; this so astonished him that he stopped, and I proceeded, but cannot write half of what I said to him in this letter; suffice it to say that I was not at a loss for words; and although they called him governor, governor, he did not appear to me bigger than a skunk, nor of any more importance.
The feelings of my heart I cannot describe when I hear such language about a man that I have never heard teach anything but truth and righteousness, for [p. 808]
Page 808