Times and Seasons, 15 September 1842

  • Source Note
Page 925
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idea of leaving her native land—and having also an aged mother, and she too somewhat dependant upon her, being sightless, are powerful drawbacks, I find, but doubt not the way will be made clear and open for us, and we shall ere long be “in your midst.” If I have had any fear in coming myself, it has arisen from these considerations: that being so physically unfitted for an agricultural life, that I should not be able to sustain myself and others with me—and to begin in a commercial line, my means at the present are so very limited that I have feared to venture on that account; but still I think when I am there, something or other will be open for me, according to my means, and wish myself again and again in your midst. I am exceedingly obliged for the trouble you took in writing to Cockson for me; he wrote to me soon after and said I should have it soon, but it is not come yet. I will write to him again and request him to transmit the same to you, and should he do so you can place that in the fund, as you think best. I wish it were double the sum. I was exceedingly interested in the perusal of the extracts from the Book of Abraham. The discovery and translation are arguments sufficient to convince any that are candid, that the God of heaven must be in our mists; and yet, strange to say, they even reject this with every other evidence.— Many thanks for the number of the Times and Seasons.
Every thing around and about us in the commercial and political world is looking dark and portentious, as if something was about to transpire that would astonish and affright the nation. Men’s hearts are beginning to quake and to fear. There is nothing but distress, perplexity, wretchedness, crime, and poverty stalking throughout the length and breadth of the land: and it seems quite impossible for matters to go on much longer in the way they are. Please present my very best remembrances to elders , —and —the former especially, having been more in his company—also, to brethren Mitchels, Melling, and others, whom you think I might know. I shall be exceedingly obliged if you will write to me again at your earliest convenience, as a letter from you will at all times be most cheering and instructive; and as I have made known to you some of my feelings and circumstances your counsel will be valuable. I think I told you that at the death of my mother I should then come into a share of property, but as this event is quite uncertain, I seem to think it is useless waiting for dead men’s shoes, but to come at once; but then, having so little without, would it not be better to wait a few years longer; and possibly by coming I might lose that, and more from another quarter, altogether. If I studied my own inclinations I should come at once, but when I look at those around me, it behooves me to consider which is the best path to pursue and adopt.
A great many of the Saints intend coming in the fall; Harrison, Greehow, Boyd, Hall, Dumville, and others, and especially your own friends, brother Cannon will come, I expect, the very first ship that sails in September. I think there seems to be a liberal spirit prevailing throughout the church in reference to the , but all feel the pressure of the times. I am sure they will do what they can. I find my paper drawing rapidly to a close—need I say in conclusion accept my warmest heartfelt thanks for all you have done—still pray for me, that I may be kept faithful—and may the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ bless you abundantly in all things. My best remembrances to you and yours, and to all the brethren and sisters, and believe me to remain yours, very sincerely in the new and everlasting covenant.
WILLIAM ROWLEY.
To .
 
————
NOTICE—EXTRA.
The travelling Elders, by obtaining subscriptions for the Times and Seasons, and Wasp, and calling upon Post Masters to frank the same according to the Post Office regulation, will confer a favor and be entitled to the gratuity proffered in the Terms
 
————
NOTICE.
The charge preferred against Elder Andrew L. Lamoreuux, in this paper, July 1st, has been withdrawn, and he restored the fellowship.
 
————
From the Antigua Herald, June 24.
EARTHQUAKE AT ANTIGUA.
This island has been visited by two severe shocks of an earthquake. The first shock commensed at about five minutes after ten o’clock this forenoon, and continued for about the space of one minute. It was succceded by another shock about one minute after the vibration of the first shock had subsided. With a vivid recollection of the horrors recently occasioned by this phenomenon at St. Domingo, our apprehensions were most awfully aroused by the first shock, which was the most severe of any similar occurrence in the island for many years; but the effects of the second shock, following so soon on its predecessor, gave rise to feelings that bid defiance to expression; and apprehensions that no power but that of the all- [p. 925]
idea of leaving her native land—and having also an aged mother, and she too somewhat dependant upon her, being sightless, are powerful drawbacks, I find, but doubt not the way will be made clear and open for us, and we shall ere long be “in your midst.” If I have had any fear in coming myself, it has arisen from these considerations: that being so physically unfitted for an agricultural life, that I should not be able to sustain myself and others with me—and to begin in a commercial line, my means at the present are so very limited that I have feared to venture on that account; but still I think when I am there, something or other will be open for me, according to my means, and wish myself again and again in your midst. I am exceedingly obliged for the trouble you took in writing to Cockson for me; he wrote to me soon after and said I should have it soon, but it is not come yet. I will write to him again and request him to transmit the same to you, and should he do so you can place that in the fund, as you think best. I wish it were double the sum. I was exceedingly interested in the perusal of the extracts from the Book of Abraham. The discovery and translation are arguments sufficient to convince any that are candid, that the God of heaven must be in our mists; and yet, strange to say, they even reject this with every other evidence.— Many thanks for the number of the Times and Seasons.
Every thing around and about us in the commercial and political world is looking dark and portentious, as if something was about to transpire that would astonish and affright the nation. Men’s hearts are beginning to quake and to fear. There is nothing but distress, perplexity, wretchedness, crime, and poverty stalking throughout the length and breadth of the land: and it seems quite impossible for matters to go on much longer in the way they are. Please present my very best remembrances to elders , —and —the former especially, having been more in his company—also, to brethren Mitchels, Melling, and others, whom you think I might know. I shall be exceedingly obliged if you will write to me again at your earliest convenience, as a letter from you will at all times be most cheering and instructive; and as I have made known to you some of my feelings and circumstances your counsel will be valuable. I think I told you that at the death of my mother I should then come into a share of property, but as this event is quite uncertain, I seem to think it is useless waiting for dead men’s shoes, but to come at once; but then, having so little without, would it not be better to wait a few years longer; and possibly by coming I might lose that, and more from another quarter, altogether. If I studied my own inclinations I should come at once, but when I look at those around me, it behooves me to consider which is the best path to pursue and adopt.
A great many of the Saints intend coming in the fall; Harrison, Greehow, Boyd, Hall, Dumville, and others, and especially your own friends, brother Cannon will come, I expect, the very first ship that sails in September. I think there seems to be a liberal spirit prevailing throughout the church in reference to the , but all feel the pressure of the times. I am sure they will do what they can. I find my paper drawing rapidly to a close—need I say in conclusion accept my warmest heartfelt thanks for all you have done—still pray for me, that I may be kept faithful—and may the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ bless you abundantly in all things. My best remembrances to you and yours, and to all the brethren and sisters, and believe me to remain yours, very sincerely in the new and everlasting covenant.
WILLIAM ROWLEY.
To .
 
————
NOTICE—EXTRA.
The travelling Elders, by obtaining subscriptions for the Times and Seasons, and Wasp, and calling upon Post Masters to frank the same according to the Post Office regulation, will confer a favor and be entitled to the gratuity proffered in the Terms
 
————
NOTICE.
The charge preferred against Elder Andrew L. Lamoreuux, in this paper, July 1st, has been withdrawn, and he restored the fellowship.
 
————
From the Antigua Herald, June 24.
EARTHQUAKE AT ANTIGUA.
This island has been visited by two severe shocks of an earthquake. The first shock commensed at about five minutes after ten o’clock this forenoon, and continued for about the space of one minute. It was succceded by another shock about one minute after the vibration of the first shock had subsided. With a vivid recollection of the horrors recently occasioned by this phenomenon at St. Domingo, our apprehensions were most awfully aroused by the first shock, which was the most severe of any similar occurrence in the island for many years; but the effects of the second shock, following so soon on its predecessor, gave rise to feelings that bid defiance to expression; and apprehensions that no power but that of the all- [p. 925]
Page 925