“A History, of the Persecution, of the Church of Jesus Christ, of Latter Day Saints in Missouri,” December 1839–October 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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pened the men were mostly gone from home that day; making arrangements for getting away. The mob that day stripped some of the saints of their arms, even to penknives; some they whipped; they shot at some, and others they hunted after; as they said to kill them.
Mobs, well lined with whiskey, as these were, looking and acting worse than savages, were well calculated to frighten women and children; which they effectually did in some cases.— One settlement were so frightened, that a party of from 130 to 150, women and children, with only six men to protect them, not waiting the return of their husbands and fathers, left their homes forthwith on foot, without taking any of their things, and wandered off south, upon the prairie a number of days under the broad canopy of heaven, not knowing which way the church was intending to go. The stubs of the newly burnt grass, and weeds, were so hard that they cut the feet of the children, who had no shoes, so that many of them became very sore, and bled profusely. Other companies fled towards the ; and in a short time the most of the church, were under way for ; some few went east, and others south. After some of the head men had left, and the saints were generally getting under way, the mob in a measure ceased to harrass them. The people of received the saints, with as much hospitality as could be expected. The losses and sacrifices of the saints, were very great in the destruction of crops, furniture, clothing and &c. and also in the loss of stock. Grain and many other things, would hardly bear transportation across the ; consequently much was left behind, that otherwise might have been got away.
After it was thought that the mob spirit had died away, some few families moved back from Van Buren county to their former homes in ; where what they had for the sustainance of themselves, and their stock was.
They had not long been back, before a mob party visited them in the night; and took some of the men and beat them with chairs and clubs, till life was nearly extinct, and then left them for dead; one by the name of [Lyman] Leonard, was a long time recovering; indeed he has never fully recovered from that beating.
There were four aged families in , who had not left their homes, whose age, infirmities and penury seemed to say, you may tarry until the spring opens; but neither age nor infirmities, would protect a saint in . These veterans, the youngest of the four being 64 years of age, were assailed by a mob party, who broke in their doors and windows, hurling large stones into their houses, whereby, some of their lives were greatly endangered; and thus they were driven from their homes, in the winter season. Some of these men have toiled and bled, in the defence of their ; one of them (Mr. Jones,) served as a life guard to General Washington in the revolutionary war. [p. 36]
pened the men were mostly gone from home that day; making arrangements for getting away. The mob that day stripped some of the saints of their arms, even to penknives; some they whipped; they shot at some, and others they hunted after; as they said to kill them.
Mobs, well lined with whiskey, as these were, looking and acting worse than savages, were well calculated to frighten women and children; which they effectually did in some cases.— One settlement were so frightened, that a party of from 130 to 150, women and children, with only six men to protect them, not waiting the return of their husbands and fathers, left their homes forthwith on foot, without taking any of their things, and wandered off south, upon the prairie a number of days under the broad canopy of heaven, not knowing which way the church was intending to go. The stubs of the newly burnt grass, and weeds, were so hard that they cut the feet of the children, who had no shoes, so that many of them became very sore, and bled profusely. Other companies fled towards the ; and in a short time the most of the church, were under way for ; some few went east, and others south. After some of the head men had left, and the saints were generally getting under way, the mob in a measure ceased to harrass them. The people of received the saints, with as much hospitality as could be expected. The losses and sacrifices of the saints, were very great in the destruction of crops, furniture, clothing and &c. and also in the loss of stock. Grain and many other things, would hardly bear transportation across the ; consequently much was left behind, that otherwise might have been got away.
After it was thought that the mob spirit had died away, some few families moved back from Van Buren county to their former homes in ; where what they had for the sustainance of themselves, and their stock was.
They had not long been back, before a mob party visited them in the night; and took some of the men and beat them with chairs and clubs, till life was nearly extinct, and then left them for dead; one by the name of Lyman Leonard, was a long time recovering; indeed he has never fully recovered from that beating.
There were four aged families in , who had not left their homes, whose age, infirmities and penury seemed to say, you may tarry until the spring opens; but neither age nor infirmities, would protect a saint in . These veterans, the youngest of the four being 64 years of age, were assailed by a mob party, who broke in their doors and windows, hurling large stones into their houses, whereby, some of their lives were greatly endangered; and thus they were driven from their homes, in the winter season. Some of these men have toiled and bled, in the defence of their ; one of them (Mr. Jones,) served as a life guard to General Washington in the revolutionary war. [p. 36]
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