History Draft [1 January–3 March 1843]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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and proposed to call.— While waiting a moment ’s horse ( went with our company) which was behind, ran and jumped into our Sleigh as we jumped out, and thence over our horse and the fence, Sleigh and all the Sleigh being still attached to the horse and the fence 8 rails high, and both horses ran over lots and thro<​ugh​> the woods clearing themselves from the Sleighs and had their frolic out without hurting themselves or drivers. it was truly a wonderful feat, and as a wonderful a deliverance for the parties— We took supper at ’s and I staid at Mr. Rose’s that night. invited the brethren to come to my house on Monday next and <​to​> chop and pile up my wood
17 February 1843 • Friday
<​Friday 17.​> returned with me to my house where we arrived about noon, and I enjoyed myself by my own fire side with many of my friends around me the remainder of the day— proposed to give me ¼th. of the city lots in
18 February 1843 • Saturday
<​Saturday 18​> <​mostly​> About home, & <​at​> the office— had many calls several called for council on points of Law of called on me— he had hurt his horse, and said it was not the first time he had missed it by not following my advice— while at dinner I remarked to my family and friends present that when the earth was sanctified and became like a sea of glass, it would become one great — <​&​> the could look in it and see as they are seen
“The &c [blank] Pres.t
19 February 1843 • Sunday
<​Sunday 19​> The follow Spent most of this day, from in <​9​> in the morning till midnight in the while <​who were​> attending to the case of and who were in dispute about their title to certain lands on the after hearing the testimony I explained the laws of the , & & shewed them that had the oldest claim and best right and left it for to say how much should have and the parties shook hands in token of a Settlement of all difficulties The following is copied from the Times & Seasons “ Ill (T&S 100 & 101) P.M.
20 February 1843 • Monday
<​Monday 20​> About 70 of the brethren came together according to previous notice and drawed and sawed and chopped and split and moved and piled up a large lot of wood in my yard— the day was spent by them in much pleasantry and good humor & feeling A White oak log measuring 5 feet & 4 inches in diameter was cut thro’ with a cross cut saw in 4½ minutes by <​bros​> & bro [John] Tidwell— This Tree had been previously cut and dr hawled by my own hands <​& team​>— from 9 to 11 this morning I was reading in German [p. 19]
and proposed to call.— While waiting a moment ’s horse ( went with our company) which was behind, ran and jumped into our Sleigh as we jumped out, and thence over our horse and the fence, Sleigh and all the Sleigh being still attached to the horse and the fence 8 rails high, and both horses ran over lots and through the woods clearing themselves from the Sleighs and had their frolic out without hurting themselves or drivers. it was truly a wonderful feat, and as wonderful a deliverance for the parties— We took supper at ’s and I staid at Mr. Rose’s that night. invited the brethren to come to my house on Monday next to chop and pile up my wood
17 February 1843 • Friday
Friday 17. returned with me to my house where we arrived about noon, and I enjoyed myself by my own fire side with many of my friends around me the remainder of the day— proposed to give me ¼th. of the city lots in
18 February 1843 • Saturday
Saturday 18 mostly About home, at the office— several called for council on points of Law of called on me— he had hurt his horse, and said it was not the first time he had missed it by not following my advice— while at dinner I remarked to my family and friends present that when the earth was sanctified and became like a sea of glass, it would be one great — & the could look in it and see as they are seen
“The &c [blank] Pres.t
19 February 1843 • Sunday
Sunday 19 Spent most of this day, from 9 in the morning till midnight in the who were attending to the case of and who were in dispute about the title to certain lands on the after hearing the testimony I explained the laws of the , & & shewed them that had the oldest claim and best right and left it for to say how much should have and the parties shook hands in token of a Settlement of all difficulties The following is copied from the Times & Seasons “ Ill (T&S 100 & 101) P.M.
20 February 1843 • Monday
Monday 20 About 70 of the brethren came together according to previous notice and drawed and sawed and chopped and split and moved and piled up a large lot of wood in my yard— the day was spent by them in much pleasantry good humor & feeling A White oak log measuring 5 feet & 4 inches in diameter was cut thro’ with a cross cut saw in 4½ minutes by & bro [John] Tidwell— This Tree had been previously cut and hawled by my own hands & team— from 9 to 11 this morning I was reading in German [p. 19]
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