Letter from Orson Hyde, 30 April 1844

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nowledge the independance of without bloodshed, then we should have a delightful soil and climate, and an opportunity of extending our conquest <​settlement​> into , and we should not be out of the reach of communication, or the necessaries and comforts of life. would be a central point for emigration, for the coming in and going out of the elders. Or if this would not do, let some man whose mind is well balanced with judgment and discretion go and establish a stake in , and let the converts from the South who have slaves gather there and raise our sugar, and we in raise their provisions: But if this is not advisable stick fast in , and hold on. Let the elders go forth in multitudes and raise up Churches, then let the twel[ve] visit those Churches and give certificates for all such to gather into and other counties contiguous as are able to buy farms, and let the poor remain where they are without certificates until we shall have a large territory, heavy and extensive agricultural capital and an abundance of produce; then let the poor come in and fill up the vacancies. If, with our limited means, we now attempt to establish manufactories, we have strength perhaps to half complete them; then we might as well have an inheritance in the moon for all the good it would do us, as to have those half finished manufactories. The fruits of agricultuaral labour are sooner realized than any other; [p. 3]
nowledge the independance of without bloodshed, then we should have a delightful soil and climate, and an opportunity of extending our settlement into , and we should not be out of the reach of communication, or the necessaries and comforts of life. would be a central point for emigration, for the coming in and going out of the elders. Or if this would not do, let some man whose mind is well balanced with judgment and discretion go and establish a stake in , and let the converts from the South who have slaves gather there and raise our sugar, and we in raise their provisions: But if this is not advisable stick fast in , and hold on. Let the elders go forth in multitudes and raise up Churches, then let the twelve visit those Churches and give certificates for all such to gather into and other counties contiguous as are able to buy farms, and let the poor remain where they are without certificates until we shall have a large territory, heavy and extensive agricultural capital and an abundance of produce; then let the poor come in and fill up the vacancies. If, with our limited means, we now attempt to establish manufactories, we have strength perhaps to half complete them; then we might as well have an inheritance in the moon for all the good it would do us, as to have those half finished manufactories. The fruits of agricultuaral labour are sooner realized than any other; [p. 3]
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