Memorial to the United States Senate and House of Representatives, circa 30 October 1839–27 January 1840

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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God, had been, in times of trial and distress like Angels visits; but not few nor far between. This last persecution had its origin at an election which was held in the county of on the first Monday in August 1838.
A Mormon went to the polls to vote, when one of the mob standing by, opposed his voting, contending that a Mormon had no more right to vote than a Negro. One angry word brought on another until unfortunately blows ensued. They are happy nevertheless to state that the Mormon was not the aggressor; having acted as they believe entirely on the defensive. Others joined in the assault; not one or two, but many against the Mormon. His brethren seeing him thus assailed by numbers and exposed to great bodily injury, interfered to rescue him from his periolous situation; when others of the mob came and joined in the affray; being determined, as they said, “that the Mormons should not vote.” A general riot now commenced; the Mormons being determined to exercise the right of voting as citizens of the ; and the mob being equally determined that they should not— victory in this instance decided on the side of right. Rumors reached the Mormons of the next day, that two of their brethren had been killed in this affray; and that a refusal had been made to surrender their bodies for burial. Not knowing at the time that this rumor was without foundation, much excitement prevailed, and several of the Mormons started for with a view of finding, if possible, for their brethren, whom they supposed to have been murdered, [p. 11]
God, had been, in times of trial and distress like Angels visits; but not few nor far between. This last persecution had its origin at an election which was held in the county of on the first Monday in August 1838.
A Mormon went to the polls to vote, when one of the mob standing by, opposed his voting, contending that a Mormon had no more right to vote than a Negro. One angry word brought on another until unfortunately blows ensued. They are happy nevertheless to state that the Mormon was not the aggressor; having acted as they believe entirely on the defensive. Others joined in the assault; not one or two, but many against the Mormon. His brethren seeing him thus assailed by numbers and exposed to great bodily injury, interfered to rescue him from his periolous situation; when others of the mob came and joined in the affray; being determined, as they said, “that the Mormons should not vote.” A general riot now commenced; the Mormons being determined to exercise the right of voting as citizens of the ; and the mob being equally determined that they should not— victory in this instance decided on the side of right. Rumors reached the Mormons of the next day, that two of their brethren had been killed in this affray; and that a refusal had been made to surrender their bodies for burial. Not knowing at the time that this rumor was without foundation, much excitement prevailed, and several of the Mormons started for with a view of finding, if possible, for their brethren, whom they supposed to have been murdered, [p. 11]
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