Letter from Orson Hyde, 26 April 1844

  • Source Note
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to the Umqua and Clamet valleys in bordering on is about 600 miles— making the distance from to the best portions of 1700 miles. There is no government established here, and it is so near that when a government should <​shall​> be established there, it may readily embrace That country likewise. There is much barren country rocks and mountains in , but the valleys are very fertile. I am persuaded that Congress will pass no act in relation to that , from the fact that the resolution requesting the to give notice to the British government for the discontinuence of the treaty of joint occupation of , was voted voted down with a rush; and this notice must be given before any action can be had unless Congress violates the treaty: at least, so say the politicians here.
has given me a map of , and also a Report on an exploration of the country lying between the and the on the line of line of <​the​> , and great Platte Rivers: by Lieut. of the corps of topographical Engineers. On receiving it, I expressed a wish that Mr. Smith could see it. . says, it is a public document, and I will frank it to him. I accepted his offer, and the book will be forth coming to him. The people are so eager for it here, that they have even stole it out of the Library. The author is ’s son-in-law. borrowed it of . I was not to tell any one in this where I got <​it​> [p. 4]
to the Umqua and Clamet valleys in bordering on is about 600 miles— making the distance from to the best portions of 1700 miles. There is no government established here, and it is so near that when a government shall be established there, it may readily embrace That country likewise. There is much barren country rocks and mountains in , but the valleys are very fertile. I am persuaded that Congress will pass no act in relation to that , from the fact that the resolution requesting the to give notice to the British government for the discontinuence of the treaty of joint occupation of , was voted down with a rush; and this notice must be given before any action can be had unless Congress violates the treaty: at least, so say the politicians here.
has given me a map of , and also a Report on an exploration of the country lying between the and the on the line of the , and great Platte Rivers: by Lieut. of the corps of topographical Engineers. On receiving it, I expressed a wish that Mr. Smith could see it. . says, it is a public document, and I will frank it to him. I accepted his offer, and the book will be forth coming to him. The people are so eager for it here, that they have even stole it out of the Library. The author is ’s son-in-law. borrowed it of . I was not to tell any one in this where I got it [p. 4]
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