History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​May 13.​> “There is already a government established in to some extent; magistrates have been chosen by the people &c. This on the south of the Columbia; north of that river the Hudson Bay Company occupy. There is some good country in , but a great deal of sandy barren desert. I have seen a gentleman who has been there, and also in .
“The most of the settlers in and are our old enemies the mobocrats of . If, however, the settlement of or be determined upon, the sooner the move is made the better; and I would not advise any delay for the action of our government; for there is such a jealousy of our rising power already, that government will do nothing to favor us. If the saints possess the Kingdom, I think they will have to take it; and the sooner it is done, the more easily it is accomplished.
“Your superior wisdom must determine whether to go to , to , or to remain within these , and send forth the most efficient men to build up Churches, and let them remain for the time being; and in the mean time send some wise men among the Indians, and teach them civilization and religion, to cultivate the soil, to live in peace with one another and with all men. But whatever you do, don’t be deluded with the hope that government will foster us, and thus delay an action which the present perhaps is the most proper time that ever will be.
is becoming a popular question; the fever of emigration begins to rage; if the Mormons become the early majority, others will not come; if the Mormons do not become an early majority, the others will not allow us to come.
is faithful, useful, and true; he has got the run of matters here very well, and is with me in all my deliberations, visitings &c.
goes with us this evening to introduce us to the , and to view the White House. [HC 6:372]
“My heart and hand are with you. May Heaven bless you and me.
As ever I am,
.”
“To the Council of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.”
Also the following letter:—
, April 26th, 1844.
“Dear Sir,
To day I trouble you with another communication which you will please have the goodness to lay before our Council.
We were last evening introduced to the at the White House by the politeness of , where we spent an hour very agreeably. The is a very plain, homespun, familiar, farmer-like man. He spoke of our troubles in , and regretted that we had met with such treatment; he asked us how we were getting along in . I told him that we were contending with the difficulties of a new country, and laboring under the disadvantageous consequences of being driven from our property and homes in .
“We have this day had a long conversation with . He is ripe for , and the . He said he would resign his seat in Congress if he could command the force that Mr Smith could, and would be on the march to that country in a month.
“I learn that the eyes of many aspiring politicians in this place are [p. 25]
May 13. “There is already a government established in to some extent; magistrates have been chosen by the people &c. This on the south of the Columbia; north of that river the Hudson Bay Company occupy. There is some good country in , but a great deal of sandy barren desert. I have seen a gentleman who has been there, and also in .
“The most of the settlers in and are our old enemies the mobocrats of . If, however, the settlement of or be determined upon, the sooner the move is made the better; and I would not advise any delay for the action of our government; for there is such a jealousy of our rising power already, that government will do nothing to favor us. If the saints possess the Kingdom, I think they will have to take it; and the sooner it is done, the more easily it is accomplished.
“Your superior wisdom must determine whether to go to , to , or to remain within these , and send forth the most efficient men to build up Churches, and let them remain for the time being; and in the mean time send some wise men among the Indians, and teach them civilization and religion, to cultivate the soil, to live in peace with one another and with all men. But whatever you do, don’t be deluded with the hope that government will foster us, and thus delay an action which the present perhaps is the most proper time that ever will be.
is becoming a popular question; the fever of emigration begins to rage; if the Mormons become the early majority, others will not come; if the Mormons do not become an early majority, the others will not allow us to come.
is faithful, useful, and true; he has got the run of matters here very well, and is with me in all my deliberations, visitings &c.
goes with us this evening to introduce us to the , and to view the White House. [HC 6:372]
“My heart and hand are with you. May Heaven bless you and me.
As ever I am,
.”
“To the Council of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.”
Also the following letter:—
, April 26th, 1844.
“Dear Sir,
To day I trouble you with another communication which you will please have the goodness to lay before our Council.
We were last evening introduced to the at the White House by the politeness of , where we spent an hour very agreeably. The is a very plain, homespun, familiar, farmer-like man. He spoke of our troubles in , and regretted that we had met with such treatment; he asked us how we were getting along in . I told him that we were contending with the difficulties of a new country, and laboring under the disadvantageous consequences of being driven from our property and homes in .
“We have this day had a long conversation with . He is ripe for , and the . He said he would resign his seat in Congress if he could command the force that Mr Smith could, and would be on the march to that country in a month.
“I learn that the eyes of many aspiring politicians in this place are [p. 25]
Page 25