History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 188
image
28 June 1844 • Friday • First of Two Entries
<​June 28​> Friday 28th. 1 A. M. The said the matter should be investigated, and that there was a great responsibility resting upon him. He also said he would send a messenger with an express for , and wrote an order for the citizens of to defend themselves. He then went to the public square, and advised all who were present to disperse, as he expected the Mormons would be so exasperated that they would come and burn the , whereupon the Citizens of fled in all directions, and the and his posse fled towards , and did not consider themselves safe until they had reached Augusta, 18 miles distant from .
At daybreak eat breakfast.
Capt. Singleton, of Brown County, arrived from with his troops [HC 6:625]
About 8 A. M. started for with the bodies of Joseph and on two wagons, accompanied by their brother , , and a guard of eight soldiers who had been detached for that purpose by . The bodies were covered with bushes to keep them from the hot sun. They were met by a great assemblage of the citizens of on Mullholland Street, about a mile east of the , about 3 P. M., under the direction of the .
The City Council, the Lieutenant General’s Staff, Major General and staff, the acting Brigadier General and Staff, commanders and officers of the Legion, and several thousands of the citizens were there amid the most solemn lamentations and wailings that ever ascended into the ears of the Lord of Hosts, to be avenged of their enemies.
When the procession arrived, the bodies were both taken into the ; the scene there cannot be described.
About 8 or 10,000 persons were addressed by Dr , Esquires and of , and Col. ; admonished the people to keep the peace, stating that he had pledged his honor and his life for their good conduct, when the people with one united voice resolved to trust to the law for a remedy of such a high handed assassination; and when that failed, to call upon God to avenge them of their wrongs.
O! Americans weep, for the glory of freedom has departed.
When the bodies of Joseph and arrived at the the doors were closed immediately, the people were told to go quietly home, and the bodies would be exhibited the next morning at 8 A. M. [HC 6:626] with the assistance of and washed the bodies from head to foot, Joseph was shot in the right breast, also under the heart, in the lower part of his bowels on the right side, and on the big wrinkle on the back part of the right hip. One ball had come out at the right shoulder blade: he put cotton soaked in camphor, into each wound, and laid the bodies out with fine plain drawers and shirts, <​white neckerchiefs​> white cotton stockings and white shrouds. (Gilbert Goldsmith was doorkeeper at the time.) After this was done, (who was at the time pregnant) was then permitted to view the bodies. On first seeing the corpse of her husband she screamed and fell, but was supported by . She then fell upon his face and kissed him, calling him by name, and begged of him to speak to her once— the scene was too affecting almost [p. 188]
28 June 1844 • Friday • First of Two Entries
June 28 Friday 28th. 1 A. M. The said the matter should be investigated, and that there was a great responsibility resting upon him. He also said he would send a messenger with an express for , and wrote an order for the citizens of to defend themselves. He then went to the public square, and advised all who were present to disperse, as he expected the Mormons would be so exasperated that they would come and burn the , whereupon the Citizens of fled in all directions, and the and his posse fled towards , and did not consider themselves safe until they had reached Augusta, 18 miles distant from .
At daybreak eat breakfast.
Capt. Singleton, of Brown County, arrived from with his troops [HC 6:625]
About 8 A. M. started for with the bodies of Joseph and on two wagons, accompanied by their brother , , and a guard of eight soldiers who had been detached for that purpose by . The bodies were covered with bushes to keep them from the hot sun. They were met by a great assemblage of the citizens of on Mullholland Street, about a mile east of the , about 3 P. M., under the direction of the .
The City Council, the Lieutenant General’s Staff, Major General and staff, the acting Brigadier General and Staff, commanders and officers of the Legion, and several thousands of the citizens were there amid the most solemn lamentations and wailings that ever ascended into the ears of the Lord of Hosts, to be avenged of their enemies.
When the procession arrived, the bodies were both taken into the ; the scene there cannot be described.
About 8 or 10,000 persons were addressed by Dr , Esquires and of , and Col. ; admonished the people to keep the peace, stating that he had pledged his honor and his life for their good conduct, when the people with one united voice resolved to trust to the law for a remedy of such a high handed assassination; and when that failed, to call upon God to avenge them of their wrongs.
O! Americans weep, for the glory of freedom has departed.
When the bodies of Joseph and arrived at the the doors were closed immediately, the people were told to go quietly home, and the bodies would be exhibited the next morning at 8 A. M. [HC 6:626] with the assistance of and washed the bodies from head to foot, Joseph was shot in the right breast, also under the heart, in the lower part of his bowels on the right side, and on the big wrinkle on the back part of the right hip. One ball had come out at the right shoulder blade: he put cotton soaked in camphor, into each wound, and laid the bodies out with fine plain drawers and shirts, white neckerchiefs white cotton stockings and white shrouds. (Gilbert Goldsmith was doorkeeper at the time.) After this was done, (who was at the time pregnant) was then permitted to view the bodies. On first seeing the corpse of her husband she screamed and fell, but was supported by . She then fell upon his face and kissed him, calling him by name, and begged of him to speak to her once— the scene was too affecting almost [p. 188]
Page 188