History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
Page 100
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<​June 14​> intelligence which I received last evening from a person no way connected with the affair, and one of undoubted veracity, I must think to myself. This gentleman informs me that he has been in since Monday last at the land sales, and he heard threatenings by the persons assembled there, that if they could get into that they would murder indiscriminately, and those who wanted to escape must leave. This your will abhor as I do. The cititzens of this who do not reside in , and those of other counties, have indeed no interest of a personal kind at stake in this matter; there are no persons disturbing them nor a going to do so, and this great excitement does savor of something else to me than a regard for the laws. Why not let the parties, as in all other cases of the kind, settle their difficulties as the laws of the country in such cases have provided. Have the citizens of ever interfered with cases of difficulty existing in other parts of the , held public meetings to inflame the public mind in favor of one party, and prejudice it against the other party? Most assuredly they have not; why then must the citizens of this place be scourged with such attempts?
“If the citizens of want the supremacy of the laws maintained, let these tumultuous assemblies diperse, and let the civil officers, if resisted, do as in other cases, call for aid instead of assembling in [HC 6:470] advance, and then call for persons to be brought into their midst as prisoners amidst threats and insults.
“From the confidence I have in your ’s superior intelligence, and sound discretion, I doubt not but your will arrive at just conclusions when the matter is submitted to your consideration, as I understand it is about being.
“I can see no need for executive interference in this case, but disperse all uncalled for assemblies, and let the laws have their regular course, which they can have if these assemblies will disperse; if not I fear the consequences.
“I send this to your as confidential, as I wish not to take any part in the affair, or be known in it.
“With consideration of high regard, I am Dr. Sir,
Your ’s most obt. Servt.,
.”
I read the doings of the City Council to , and gave him a volume of the Times and Seasons. About 4 P.M., I rode out with . Pleasant and warm day— towards night some clouds.
<​a. m.​> was tried before Esquire , J. P., on a charge of firing ’s printing office, and acquitted.
15 June 1844 • Saturday
<​15​> Saturday 15. At home. Two brethren came from , and said that Col. had demanded the arms belonging to the Mormons in that neighborhood; they wished my advice on the subject. I told them that when they gave up their arms to give up their lives with them as dear as possible.
It is reported that a company of men were constantly training at . Mr. John M. Cane from said that several boxes of arms had arrived at from ; there was some considerable excitement, but expected they were going to wait the meeting at , which was fixed for the middle of next week.
The “Maid of Iowa” arrived at 2½ P.M., while I was examining the painting of “Death on the Pale Horse” by Benjn. West, which has been exhibiting in my reading room for the last three days. The “Maid” had [HC 6:471] lost her lighter which was loaded at the time with corn and lumber, it having broken in two on a snag in the Iowa river.
This morning started for to carry letters and papers to concerning the destruction of the Expositor Press. [p. 100]
June 14 intelligence which I received last evening from a person no way connected with the affair, and one of undoubted veracity, I must think to myself. This gentleman informs me that he has been in since Monday last at the land sales, and he heard threatenings by the persons assembled there, that if they could get into that they would murder indiscriminately, and those who wanted to escape must leave. This your will abhor as I do. The cititzens of this who do not reside in , and those of other counties, have indeed no interest of a personal kind at stake in this matter; there are no persons disturbing them nor a going to do so, and this great excitement does savor of something else to me than a regard for the laws. Why not let the parties, as in all other cases of the kind, settle their difficulties as the laws of the country in such cases have provided. Have the citizens of ever interfered with cases of difficulty existing in other parts of the , held public meetings to inflame the public mind in favor of one party, and prejudice it against the other party? Most assuredly they have not; why then must the citizens of this place be scourged with such attempts?
“If the citizens of want the supremacy of the laws maintained, let these tumultuous assemblies diperse, and let the civil officers, if resisted, do as in other cases, call for aid instead of assembling in [HC 6:470] advance, and then call for persons to be brought into their midst as prisoners amidst threats and insults.
“From the confidence I have in your ’s superior intelligence, and sound discretion, I doubt not but your will arrive at just conclusions when the matter is submitted to your consideration, as I understand it is about being.
“I can see no need for executive interference in this case, but disperse all uncalled for assemblies, and let the laws have their regular course, which they can have if these assemblies will disperse; if not I fear the consequences.
“I send this to your as confidential, as I wish not to take any part in the affair, or be known in it.
“With consideration of high regard, I am Dr. Sir,
Your ’s most obt. Servt.,
.”
I read the doings of the City Council to , and gave him a volume of the Times and Seasons. About 4 P.M., I rode out with . Pleasant and warm day— towards night some clouds.
a. m. was tried before Esquire , J. P., on a charge of firing ’s printing office, and acquitted.
15 June 1844 • Saturday
15 Saturday 15. At home. Two brethren came from , and said that Col. had demanded the arms belonging to the Mormons in that neighborhood; they wished my advice on the subject. I told them that when they gave up their arms to give up their lives with them as dear as possible.
It is reported that a company of men were constantly training at . Mr. John M. Cane from said that several boxes of arms had arrived at from ; there was some considerable excitement, but expected they were going to wait the meeting at , which was fixed for the middle of next week.
The “Maid of Iowa” arrived at 2½ P.M., while I was examining the painting of “Death on the Pale Horse” by Benjn. West, which has been exhibiting in my reading room for the last three days. The “Maid” had [HC 6:471] lost her lighter which was loaded at the time with corn and lumber, it having broken in two on a snag in the Iowa river.
This morning started for to carry letters and papers to concerning the destruction of the Expositor Press. [p. 100]
Page 100