History, 1838–1856, volume F-1 [1 May 1844–8 August 1844]

  • Source Note
  • Historical Introduction
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<​May 21​> Norton Jacobs, and Moses Smith, arrived direct from on their way to .
“20th. We have appointed a political meeting in Newark, this evening, and one at Juliet tomorrow evening; where we expect to present to the citizens, General Smith’s views of the powers and policy of the government, and discuss the subject of politics.
,
.”
22 May 1844 • Wednesday
<​22​> Wednesday 22 At home, watching, as the officers from were after me. At 10 A. M., about 40 Indians of the Sacs and Foxes, came up in front of the , four or five of them being mounted; among whom was Black Hawk’s brother, Kis-Kish-Kee, &c. I was obliged to send word I coud not see them at present. They encamped in the Council Chamber afternoon [HC 6:401] and night. I was with the police on duty, and saw several individuals lurking around.
Very pleasant day.
Prsident preached to the brethren in this evening.
23 May 1844 • Thursday
<​23​> Thursday 23 rather better. Read Hebrew with , and counseled with various friends. At 10 A. M, the Municipal Court met, presiding; but there not being a quorum present, adjourned for one week. At one P. M., had a talk with the Sac and Fox Indians in my <​back​> kitchen. They said: “When our fathers first came here, this land was inhabited by the Spanish; when the Spaniards were driven off the French came, and then the English and Americans; and our fathers talked a great deal with the Big Spirit.” They complained that they had been robbed of their lands by the whites, and cruelly treated. I told them I knew they had been wronged, but that we had bought this land and paid our money for it. I advised them not to sell any more land, but to cultivate peace with the different tribes, and with all men; as the Great Spirit wanted them to be united and to live in peace. “The Great Spirit has enabled me to find a book, (shewing them the book of Mormon) which told me about your fathers, and the Great Spirit told me, ‘you must send to all the tribes that you can, and tell them to live in peace’; and when any of our people come to see you, I want you to treat them as we treat you.”
At 3 p. m., the Indians commenced a war dance in front of my ; our people commenced with music and firing cannon. After the dance which lasted about two hours, the firing of cannon closed the exercise, and with our music, marched back to the . Before they commenced dancing the saints took up a collection to get the Indians food. [HC 6:402]
came to my clerk, , and told him an officer was on his way with an attachment for him; and that the Grand Jury had found a Bill against me for adultery, on the testimony of ; he had come from in two hours and thirty minutes to bring the news. came to my and staid all night. came from , and said that had been swearing that I swore to the complaint on which Simpson was arrested. I instructed and to go to in the morning, and have him indicted for perjury, as I never did swear to the complaint. The officer was after also, and report says , , and . Past nine p. m, I walked a little way with for exercise.
My brother called in the evening, and cautioned me against speaking so freely about my enemies &c, in such a manner <​as​> to make it actionable. I [p. 52]
May 21 Norton Jacobs, and Moses Smith, arrived direct from on their way to .
“20th. We have appointed a political meeting in Newark, this evening, and one at Juliet tomorrow evening; where we expect to present to the citizens, General Smith’s views of the powers and policy of the government, and discuss the subject of politics.
,
.”
22 May 1844 • Wednesday
22 Wednesday 22 At home, watching, as the officers from were after me. At 10 A. M., about 40 Indians of the Sacs and Foxes, came up in front of the , four or five of them being mounted; among whom was Black Hawk’s brother, Kis-Kish-Kee, &c. I was obliged to send word I coud not see them at present. They encamped in the Council Chamber afternoon [HC 6:401] and night. I was with the police on duty, and saw several individuals lurking around.
Very pleasant day.
Prsident preached to the brethren in this evening.
23 May 1844 • Thursday
23 Thursday 23 rather better. Read Hebrew with , and counseled with various friends. At 10 A. M, the Municipal Court met, presiding; but there not being a quorum present, adjourned for one week. At one P. M., had a talk with the Sac and Fox Indians in my back kitchen. They said: “When our fathers first came here, this land was inhabited by the Spanish; when the Spaniards were driven off the French came, and then the English and Americans; and our fathers talked a great deal with the Big Spirit.” They complained that they had been robbed of their lands by the whites, and cruelly treated. I told them I knew they had been wronged, but that we had bought this land and paid our money for it. I advised them not to sell any more land, but to cultivate peace with the different tribes, and with all men; as the Great Spirit wanted them to be united and to live in peace. “The Great Spirit has enabled me to find a book, (shewing them the book of Mormon) which told me about your fathers, and the Great Spirit told me, ‘you must send to all the tribes that you can, and tell them to live in peace’; and when any of our people come to see you, I want you to treat them as we treat you.”
At 3 p. m., the Indians commenced a war dance in front of my ; our people commenced with music and firing cannon. After the dance which lasted about two hours, the firing of cannon closed the exercise, and with our music, marched back to the . Before they commenced dancing the saints took up a collection to get the Indians food. [HC 6:402]
came to my clerk, , and told him an officer was on his way with an attachment for him; and that the Grand Jury had found a Bill against me for adultery, on the testimony of ; he had come from in two hours and thirty minutes to bring the news. came to my and staid all night. came from , and said that had been swearing that I swore to the complaint on which Simpson was arrested. I instructed and to go to in the morning, and have him indicted for perjury, as I never did swear to the complaint. The officer was after also, and report says , , and . Past nine p. m, I walked a little way with for exercise.
My brother called in the evening, and cautioned me against speaking so freely about my enemies &c, in such a manner as to make it actionable. I [p. 52]
Page 52